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Should Southern states fly the Confederate flag in any form?

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Freedom First!

The Fourth of July we celebrate this weekend heralds a document proclaiming both our nation's independence and our unwavering commitment to freedom.

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Updated: jul. 05, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Constitutional ignorance and dereliction

The nation's demagogues and constitutionally ignorant are using the Charleston, South Carolina, AME church shooting to attack the Second Amendment's "right of the people to keep and bear Arms." A couple of years ago, President Barack Obama said, "I have a profound respect for the traditions of hunting that trace back in this country for generations."

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Posted: jul. 03, 2015 5:16 p.m. | Updated: jul. 05, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Mass Hysteria in America

In the 1400s, a nun in a French convent started making sounds like a cat. Other nuns began to do the same. Eventually, they started biting one another. As word of the bitings spread, so, too, did the bitings. They swept through other convents all the way to Rome.

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Posted: jul. 03, 2015 5:21 p.m. | Updated: jul. 05, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution’s vice president of university affairs.

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Posted: jul. 03, 2015 5:23 p.m. | Updated: jul. 05, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution’s vice president of university affairs.

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Posted: jul. 03, 2015 5:23 p.m. | Updated: jul. 05, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Charleston's compassion

A black church, a maladjusted white kid, and the nation moaning, “My God, not again.” A few selected politicians, firm believers in the theory of ‘never let a good crisis go to waste’, exploited the tragedy to push for more gun control on law abiding citizens. Shame on them. Thankfully, the majority of politicians did the decent thing by grieving with the rest of the country and graciously keeping their mouths shut. Condolences and heart-felt words for the fallen were and always will be a proper and suitable way to express sympathy for a heartbreak such as Charleston.

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Posted: jun. 27, 2015 2:44 p.m. | Updated: jun. 28, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Prejudice wrong belief system, but not part of country's DNA

Long before last week's killings in Charleston, South Carolina, which appear to have been motivated by racial hatred, at least one expert in belief systems wrote that a person's prejudices can be changed.

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Posted: jun. 27, 2015 2:45 p.m. | Updated: jun. 28, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Five young men can define a successful life

Five young men, ages 18 to 23. Two college graduates. Two currently attending college. The youngest headed that way this fall. All good students. All excellent athletes. All standing resolutely before a large assemblage to pay tribute to their grandfather, Rob Neely, who passed away recently after a courageous battle with cancer. And what a tribute it was.

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Posted: jun. 27, 2015 2:46 p.m. | Updated: jun. 28, 2015 5:00 a.m.

States don’t have rights, people have rights

Next week, we'll be celebrating the 239th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The eloquent cries for freedom and equality voiced in that properly revered document have become what professors Sid Milkis and Marc Landy call the "American Creed." It's a belief that all of us have the right to do whatever we want with our lives so long as we don't interfere with the right of others to do the same.

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Posted: jun. 27, 2015 2:48 p.m. | Updated: jun. 28, 2015 5:00 a.m.

You're what you say you are

Rachel A. Dolezal, the recently resigned president of the Spokane, Washington, office of the NAACP, has come under a bit of controversy. Both of her parents are white, but for eight years, Dolezal claimed that she was black. In addition to her role as president of an NAACP chapter, Dolezal was an instructor of Africana studies at Eastern Washington University.

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Posted: jun. 27, 2015 2:49 p.m. | Updated: jun. 28, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Celebrity Politics

It's official. On Tuesday, Donald Trump announced that he is officially running for president of the United States. "And we are going to make our country great again," he added. While I agree with his goal -- making America great again -- it will be interesting to see if his running for the nomination takes us along this path.

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Posted: jun. 20, 2015 12:43 p.m. | Updated: jun. 21, 2015 5:00 a.m.

A Lack of Trust

Neither Donald Trump nor Ben Carson will be president of the United States. Having observed political campaigns actively since 1988, neither campaign has the connections, opinion leader support or organizational abilities to win the nomination. But they are candidates who can throw a wrench in the process.

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Posted: jun. 20, 2015 12:50 p.m. | Updated: jun. 21, 2015 5:00 a.m.

A Ray of Hope Far from Washington

Listening to the political junkies discuss the 2016 presidential election more than a year ahead of time is enough to depress just about anyone who has a life outside the political bubble. It will get even worse next year with the avalanche of civic pollution known as campaign commercials.

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Posted: jun. 20, 2015 12:51 p.m. | Updated: jun. 21, 2015 5:00 a.m.

A Ray of Hope Far from Washington

Listening to the political junkies discuss the 2016 presidential election more than a year ahead of time is enough to depress just about anyone who has a life outside the political bubble. It will get even worse next year with the avalanche of civic pollution known as campaign commercials.

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Posted: jun. 20, 2015 12:52 p.m. | Updated: jun. 21, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Happy 800th birthday, Magna Carta!

What sometimes seem like epic battles to reshape the world generally fade to irrelevance very quickly. To take just one recent example, 20 years ago the Justice Department was trying to break up Microsoft because the software giant was perceived as too powerful to be challenged by other firms. Today, of course, all the talk is of Google and Apple with Microsoft struggling to find a niche.

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Posted: jun. 13, 2015 5:01 p.m. | Updated: jun. 14, 2015 4:00 a.m.

Improving black education is necessary

Last summer's Ferguson, Missouri, disturbances revealed that while blacks were 67 percent of its population, only three members of its 53-officer police force were black. Some might conclude that such a statistic is evidence of hiring discrimination. That's a possibility, but we might ask what percentage of blacks met hiring qualifications on the civil service examination. Are there hundreds of blacks in Ferguson and elsewhere who achieve passing scores on civil service examinations who are then refused employment? There is no evidence suggesting an affirmative answer to that question.

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Posted: jun. 13, 2015 5:02 p.m. | Updated: jun. 14, 2015 4:00 a.m.

Dangling participles, feds keep close watch on columnist

Last week, Congress passed and President Obama signed legislation that will alter somewhat how federal law enforcement can monitor our phone calls in the future.

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Posted: jun. 13, 2015 5:05 p.m. | Updated: jun. 14, 2015 4:00 a.m.

Intellectual dishonesty

President Barack Obama's stance, expressed in his 2014 State of the Union address, is that the debate is settled and climate change is a fact. Obama is by no means unique in that view. Former Vice President Al Gore declared that "the science is settled." This "settled science" vision about climate is held by many, including those in academia. To call any science settled is sheer idiocy. Had mankind acted as though any science could possibly be settled, we'd be living in caves, as opposed to having the standard of living we enjoy today. That higher standard of ...

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Posted: jun. 06, 2015 4:55 p.m. | Updated: jun. 07, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Georgia is trending for the better

As a legislator, I am constantly introduced to studies showing current trends that are impacting Georgia. None of these are as important as demographics.

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Posted: jun. 06, 2015 4:59 p.m. | Updated: jun. 07, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Kick back and enjoy the unfolding primary season

School is out, Memorial Day is past and summer stretches in front of us. Maybe it's because I live in the South, but summer seems to be a time when everything slows down, as if to pay homage to the heat and humidity that abound. Without the invention of air conditioning, there is not doubt there would be few who would choose to live in the deep South today, at least during the summer.

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Posted: jun. 06, 2015 5:02 p.m. | Updated: jun. 07, 2015 5:00 a.m.

The value of awe

Selfies, followers, likes and the fascination with celebrity anythings (chefs, decorators, stylists, authors, etc.) are just a few of the ways that today's society focuses attention on individuals. It's not enough to be a great chef — it's better to be a celebrity chef. It's not enough to participate in an event — it's better to snap a selfie of yourself at the event and then post it online for all to see.

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Posted: may. 30, 2015 11:56 a.m. | Updated: may. 31, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Liberals respect me

During the early years of the Reagan administration, a Washington news conference was held for me for my first book, "The State Against Blacks." Before making summary statements about the book, I offered the reporters assembled that they could treat me like a white person. They could ask me hard, pressing questions. They could demand proof of the arguments that I was making.

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Posted: may. 30, 2015 11:57 a.m. | Updated: may. 31, 2015 5:00 a.m.

This way comes

"The difference between Bush's mistakes and his disappointments may just be that he hasn't yet taken ownership of the latter," Massimo Calabresi wrote in Time as he covered President George W. Bush's final press conference in January of 2009. Four years earlier, left-wing journalist John Dickerson had begun a trend among the Bush White House press corps, demanding from the president a recognition of his mistakes.

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Posted: may. 30, 2015 11:59 a.m. | Updated: may. 31, 2015 5:00 a.m.

Election 2016, Natural Rights and American Exceptionalism

Political reporters seem to enjoy the game of politics far more than the substance of issues. But recent Supreme Court rulings on the president's health care law, campaign finance reform and other topics may force a fundamental issue into the 2016 election. Upcoming rulings on same-sex marriage, immigration and another health care case will add fuel to the fire.

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Posted: may. 30, 2015 12:00 p.m. | Updated: may. 31, 2015 5:00 a.m.

What Nobel Peace Laureates have incurred should not have occurred

I have been trying to figure out what to do with my free time now that I have decided not to run for President of the United States (or what’s left of it.) Some of you wrote and asked me to reconsider my decision. I am humbled by your pledges of support but I don’t want to broach the subject again with the Woman Who Shares My Name. She has access to a lot of broccoli and says she know where she can get more. I had best leave that alone.

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Posted: may. 21, 2015 4:30 p.m.

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