View Mobile Site

Articles by Section - Health


Go red for women

February 15… the day after Valentine's Day. If you are one of the 62% of Americans celebrate Valentine's Day, happy day-after. This is when all that Valentine's Day chocolate goes on sale! If you have small children, you spent the days leading up to Valentine's Day in a frenzy of glue and glitter.

February 22, 2015 | | Health


Eat your way to a healthy, happy you

My super-busy life began seven years ago when my dad was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. At the time, his diagnosis was really scary for our family.

February 01, 2015 | Staff Report | Health


National Wear Red Day February 6

The color of February is red. Not for Valentine's Day (though that is so romantic that you thought that). No, the color of February is red… for women's heart disease.

February 01, 2015 | Hosanna Fletcher | Health


The sneaky thief of sight

I have to admit something: I grew up in an era that made fun of kids with glasses. Especially big, thick ones. Now these thick, dark frames are all the rage. So the last time I went to the eye doctor, I had a hard time picking out frames because all I saw were big, thick, dark frames, until I found these lovely red ones (yes red!).

January 24, 2015 | Hosanna Fletcher | Health


YMCA gets new treadmills

As Newton County is growing and developing, so is the local YMCA. Located on 2140 Newton Drive Northeast, the YMCA has received several new treadmills that will replace old ones.

January 24, 2015 | Mikayla Newton | Health


Beating the winter blues

The sun will rise at 7:41 a.m. on Monday. And it will set at 5:46 a.m. that same day. That means that we will have 10 hours of daylight on Monday. We have already passed the shortest day of the year – the winter solstice was on December 21. With the recent grey and rainy weather of the past couple weeks, it may seem like these are all short days of daylight, if we even see the sun at all. I recently was asked by a friend if London had relocated to Covington. I then had to ...

January 18, 2015 | Hosanna Fletcher | Health


Playing for Keeps: New Year’s resolutions that last

Here we are in the New Year, and if you're like most people, you've made resolutions to lose weight, eat better, get more exercise, and generally take better care of yourself.

January 16, 2015 | Christine Myers | Health


1

Page 1 of 1

Archive By Section - Health


Cancer survival rates vary by country

A recent article in England's medical journal "The Lancet" reported that survival rates for four major cancers are lower in the United Kingdom (excluding Scotland), than in Australia, Canada, Sweden and Norway, and equivalent with those of Denmark. The study was from the International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership. Differences in diagnoses and treatment in these countries are considered to account for this finding.

December 25, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Personality and Health

Your attitude can effect how healthy your heart is.

December 10, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Reports: more women are getting rheumatoid arthritis

According to a recent study from the Mayo Clinic, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in women has increased between the years 1995 and 2007. This rise follows a four year decline in the disease and is speculated to be effected by environmental factors such as cigarette smoking, vitamin D deficiency and lower dose synthetic estrogens in oral contraceptives.

The Mayo Clinic study was published in June in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism and included over 50 years of epidemiological data. RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that attacks skeletal joints, effecting between 1 million and 2 million Americans. People with RA usually ...

November 07, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Cancer deaths slowing in the U.S.

According to a recent report from the American Cancer Society, death rates from cancer are continuing to decline in the U.S. That's the good news. The bad news is that hundreds of thousands of Americans still die of cancer each year. The ACS attributes the slow but steady drop in cancer deaths to lower rates of smoking, increased efforts at early detection and better treatments. Between the years 2001 and 2006 the death rates for all cancers decreased 2 percent per year in men, and 1.5 percent per year in women.

November 03, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


If you want to improve your memory, take a nap

This month researchers reported online in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, that good study habits should include a lot of napping. When compared to those who didn't sleep, or slept but didn't report dreams, study subjects who napped after learning a task and dreamed about it recalled it the best.

September 22, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Health benefits of pets

Most readers who own a pet, be it dog, cat, bird, ferret, horse or other creature, can probably speak to the emotional benefits of owning an adoring animal. Anecdotes are prolific about the human health benefits of companion animals, both service and therapy animals, and family pets. (I'm not too sure about goldfish, however.) But in-depth scientific research into this apparently obvious phenomenon are rare. Now, however, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, part of the National Institutes of Health, is embarking on a study of whether animals can have tangible effects on ...

September 19, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


The mother’s weight during pregnancy affects child's adult weight

If a mother gains too much weight during her pregnancy she places her child at an increased risk of being overweight farther down the road. This is according to a recent study published in Lancet, England's premier medical journal. The researchers were American and funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. They followed all births in Michigan and New Jersey between the years 1989 and 2003. Of the 513,000 women and 1.1 million infants that were a part of the study, scientists found that women who gained more than 53 pounds during pregnancy gave birth ...

August 27, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Elicit drugs found to have healing properties

Who would have thought that the drugs Ecstasy and Ketamine, outlawed by the Controlled Substances Act, would be found to have properties that really helped people. These drugs became popular during the 1990s as "club drugs" prolific in all-night raves. MDMA, popularly known as Ecstacy, and Ketamine were drugs that could earn you the same sentence for selling them as it would if you were caught selling heroin or methamphetamine.

August 20, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Cutting down on children’s summer accidents

Summer can be rough on a kid, as most parents know. Children and adolescents fall, crash their bicycles, burn themselves, almost drown and are in car crashes. Falls lead this list of the most common reasons children are admitted to hospitals during summer months.

August 04, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Here's To Your Health: Obama’s health care overhaul

Here is some information about President Barrack Obama's massive heathcare overhaul bill that was signed into being on March 22, 2010:

Coverage: 32 million uninsured. The major increase in coverage will begin in year 2014. When it is fully installed, 94 percent of eligible non-elderly Americans will have coverage. Current coverage is 83 percent.

May 26, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Spare the rod and save the child?

People have been arguing about the value of corporal punishment of children for a very long time. Fanning the flames of this debate has been conflicting research supporting the opposing ideologies. Recently, however, a five year effort to review the scientific literature by the family services division of the American Psychological Association has reached a conclusion, "parents and caregivers should reduce and potentially eliminate their use of any physical punishment as a disciplinary measure."

May 07, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Debunking pop psychology

There is a lot of "common" wisdom out there, beliefs that most of us take for granted, but rarely put to the test. For instance, it is believed that "blowing off steam" and ranting when we are angry helps us unload our stresses and leads to calmer nerves. Not so, according to researchers. Ranters actually maintain higher levels of stress and tension than those who contain angry outbursts and try to express their feelings in a less aggressive manner. Here are some more offered by the editors of Psychology Today:

May 05, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Safety of high tech scanners considered by FDA

This week the U.S. Federal Drug Administration is hearing proposals for changing the ways that high tech medical scanning techniques are used. There is a growing concern that Americans are exposed to too much radiation by these new imaging technologies, such as CT scans and fluoroscopy. The agency is looking for ways to get the manufacturers of these devices to maintain higher standards and increase the amount of training required to operate the equipment

April 28, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


Here's to you health: Global warming making allergies worse

Anyone with allergies in Georgia can probably tell you they are worse than ever this year. After an unusually cold and snowy winter followed by an early and warm spring, pollen counts have soared in most of the U.S., especially in the Southeast. The Southeast is blessed with some of the most allergenic cities in the country and Atlanta is one of the very highest.

Daily weather reports currently list the daily pollen count, which is the number of pollen grains in a cubic meter of air. A pollen count of 120 is considered to be high. In the ...

April 18, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


To avoid dementia - live with purpose

As our population ages, dementia becomes a more frequent diagnosis. Alzheimer's is the most common type of dementia, and is characterized by a global loss of intellectual functioning. A person who has dementia has cognitive problems with memory, reasoning, perception and motor skills that gets worse as they get older. There is not a cure for it, and little is known about its causes.

The incentive to understand the causes of the disease, and its precursor - mild cognitive impairment, increases as the numbers of people with dementia rises. Aron S. Buchman is an associate professor in the department of ...

April 04, 2010 | Kirven Weekley | Health


« First  « Prev  2 3 4 5 6  Next »  Last »

Page 4 of 6


Please wait ...