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Cohen: Nixon’s lasting damage

Richard Nixon is not having an easy time of late. The Washington Post alone has run at least three opinion pieces reminding us all that Nixon was a skunk who 40 years ago this month resigned the presidency and flew off to a short-lived exile in California. There the story of Nixon's nefariousness supposedly ends. But it does not. He remains to this day a major political figure.

August 05, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Williams: Please stop helping us

While reading the first chapter of Jason Riley's new book, "Please Stop Helping Us," I thought about Will Rogers' Prohibition-era observation that "Oklahomans vote dry as long as they can stagger to the polls." Demonstrative of similar dedication, one member of Congress told Vanderbilt University political scientist Carol Swain that "one of the advantages and disadvantages of representing blacks is their shameless loyalty. ... You can almost get away with raping babies and be forgiven. You don't have any vigilance about your performance." In my opinion, there appear to be no standards of performance low enough for blacks to ...

August 02, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Disappointment, distrust, hope

Publisher note:

August 02, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Republicans — future versus past

As I wrote in last week's column about Georgia's U.S. Senate race between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue, it will all boil down to turnout - who turns out to vote. While the Republican candidates are being fair when they tie the Democratic nominee to the Obama administration, they must do more than hope that Democrats can't persuade voters to go to the polls. The Republican candidates need to create and communicate a clear, compelling message for all voters - that will give them a reason and the passion to turn out and vote Republican this ...

July 31, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Massie: Be very afraid, especially for your children

On July 1, 2014, I wrote a syndicated column titled "What If Terrorists Used Infectious Diseases." I postulated that America is being placed in mortal danger as illegal aliens, to which I specifically add the tens of thousands of illegal alien children, are flooding our borders.

July 31, 2014 | | Columnists


Yarbrough: Trying to determine who is the real outsider in U.S. Senate race

The U.S. Senate race this November between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue will be one of the more unusual campaigns we have witnessed in Georgia. Neither has held public office and both are anxious to portray themselves as the ultimate "outsider."

July 29, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Exonerating the criminals

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's anti-Semitism is getting the better of him. Once again, the Turkish prime minister has trotted out the Hitler analogy in relation to Israel and what it has done in Gaza. "They curse Hitler morning and night," he said of the Israelis. "However, now their barbarism has surpassed even Hitler's."

July 29, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Opposition to Hobby Lobby decision highlights problem with mandates

Following the Hobby Lobby Supreme Court decision, one of the key talking points that emerged from enraged opponents of the ruling was: "My boss shouldn't be involved in my health care decisions." California State Senate candidate Sandra Fluke says on her official website that such a perspective is "common sense."

July 26, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Do blacks need favors?

Earlier this month, the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act was celebrated. During the act's legislative debate, then-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, responding to predictions, promised, "I'll eat my hat if this leads to racial quotas." I don't know whether Humphrey got around to keeping his promise, but here's my question: Is it within the capacity of black Americans to make it in this society without the special favors variously called racial preferences, quotas, affirmative action and race-sensitive policies? What might a "yes" answer to that question assume and imply about blacks? Likewise, what would a "no ...

July 26, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Cohen: A fight for Israel’s existence

Israel fought its first war, in 1948, against five Arab nations - Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan - as well as the Palestinians. In the prediction of the fairly new CIA, the outcome was never in doubt: "Without substantial outside aid in terms of manpower and material, they [the Jews] will be able to hold out no longer than two years." It has now been 66 years, but I fear that sooner or later, the CIA's conclusion could turn out to be right.

July 24, 2014 | | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


It’s Southern pride, battered and fried

My hero and professional role model, Chicago Tribune's Mike Royko, had an astounding piece recently. According to Royko, at an auto plant in Normal, Illinois, an executive asked the company that ran the plant's cafeteria to offer some more variety.

November 10, 2010 | Lewis Grizzard | Columnists


The man’s guide to the laundry room

The washer and dryer are two of the biggest and most dangerous machines anyone can own. So, why do most guys avoid the laundry room like they avoid a Tupperware party? I think it's because most men don't see the washer and dryer as "power tools." Well, that's got to change. Our wives would appreciate some help with the laundry, so I'm going to teach you how to operate those gigantic monsters.

November 10, 2010 | David McCoy | Columnists


What will it take to fix our borders?

The next time the illegal immigration advocates start whining about the poor Mexican workers coming into the United States to "do jobs we won't do" and to "make a better life for their families," please inform them that the porous borders between lawless Mexico and the U.S. are also letting in drugs at a scale almost beyond description and that Atlanta is a major distribution hub for the hombres.

November 10, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Father knows best on election

My first election memory is from 1974, when I was 7. President Nixon had recently resigned, succeeded by Gerald Ford. The Democratic Party picked up 49 seats in the House for a total of 291. In the Senate, the Democrats picked up four seats for 61 total. But for me, my memories are more personal. My father, Newt Gingrich, lost his first run for the Sixth Congressional District in Georgia.

November 07, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Of Alvin York and Armistice Day

One of the most unforgettable people I ever encountered was my eighth grade American history teacher. In 1964, Greensboro was so tiny that all grades were housed on the same campus, so he was familiar to everyone. But not until I was 13, and in his class, did I get to know a Tennessean with some Indian blood in him, Mr. G. M. Charles.

Now, the whole town knew Mr. Charles as assistant principal and football coach. But he was startling in appearance to young people, as his Indian features were exaggerated by the effects of an automobile wreck which ...

November 06, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Politicians deserve a time-out

Let's say your side or candidate won or lost last Tuesday. Aren't you just a little bit embarrassed by what it took to win or lose this election?

November 05, 2010 | Barbara Morgan Columnist | Columnists


Is Obama anti-business?

The claims that President Obama is "anti-business" during the recent elections surprised me.

November 04, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Y'all come: We want to hear from you

I write better than I talk, which is a good thing, considering how I make a living.

November 02, 2010 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Our thoughts... Some thoughts

There was much happening in the news this week. Here are some of our observations:

October 31, 2010 | Staff Report | Columnists


Help Caleb make a difference

A friend recently shared with me a musing of T. S. Eliot in which he wrote, "...and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time."

October 31, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Our system works

We have a unique system of government. It began when we declared our independence from England on July 4, 1776. As a people, we had become increasingly unhappy with leaders in England making decisions that affected our lives and our livelihoods. Eventually, we were forced to a decision point: to fold under the tyranny of England or fight for liberty. As Patrick Henry so eloquently stated, "Give me liberty, or give me death."

October 31, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Adventure lost on the highways with GPS

I heard last week that Rep. Jim Marshall (D., Ga.) is no fan of a GPS system. The Vietnam vet is still partial to an old-fashioned map for navigating his way up, down and across his meandering Eighth Congressional District. One aide told me that a staffer recently tried planting one on the windshield of the congressman's car as they set out for a day of campaigning and Marshall swiftly snatched it off and tossed it into the backseat with a warning not to bring it out again.

October 29, 2010 | Barbara Morgan news@covnews.com | Columnists


Be your own financial boss

A bankruptcy court judge I knew would tell people: "Pay yourself at the first of every month. That is your pay for living. Put that money in the bank. Then when you want to buy something, you can pay cash, and get at least three or four times as much as if you were buying on credit."

October 29, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Supe's Corner

For years, I have spent time in classrooms observing teachers teach. I've done so to be familiar with the main work of our profession, classroom instruction. More often than not, I've found teachers working hard at direct "teacher talk" or "lecture" to students. Unfortunately, I've not always seen the kids working equally hard.

October 27, 2010 | Gary Mathews NCSS Superintendent | Columnists


Superintendent must champion public education

In my house, the contest for state school superintendent is as important as the governor's race. I have a son, son-in-law and now a grandson who are public schoolteachers and they, and all teachers, deserve a draw-a-line-in-the-sand advocate.

October 27, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


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