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Articles by Section - Columnists


Pumpkins growing weary

Can it be? Is it September already? One of my favorite tunes, "September Song," was written by Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson for a Broadway musical in 1938 called "Knickerbocker Holiday. The lyrics could apply today to the current political season in Georgia - "For it's a long, long time from May to December, but the days grow short when you reach September."

September 02, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Try realism in the Middle East

America rarely does time capsules anymore, but the ones it does should include videos from February 2011 of American TV reporters exulting in the triumph of the Arab Spring. "This is the sound of a people rising," ABC's Terry Moran told us from Cairo. For Egyptians, it was a day "when a people rose and made themselves a new country, a new world, a new life."

September 02, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Blacks must confront reality

Though racial discrimination exists, it is nowhere near the barrier it once was. The relevant question is: How much of what we see today can be explained by racial discrimination? This is an important question because if we conclude that racial discrimination is the major cause of black problems when it isn't, then effective solutions will be elusive forever. To begin to get a handle on the answer, let's pull up a few historical facts about black Americans.

August 30, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Time to call a spade a spade

As the character Cecily said to Miss Fairfax in a play written by Oscar Wilde entitled "The Importance of being Earnest": "When I see a spade I call it a spade."

August 30, 2014 | Mychal massie | Columnists


In 1970, we had a riot; Ferguson looks like war

The news from Ferguson, Missouri, has brought back unpleasant memories from the long-ago riots in Asbury Park, New Jersey. It was the summer of 1970, and I was a young teenager close enough to the action to be appropriately frightened.

August 28, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


The Value of Work and Labor Day

My first paying job was cleaning the bathrooms at the First Baptist Church of Carrollton, Georgia, where I was a member. I was 14, the minimum age for "children" to work. This was neither glamorous nor exciting work, but useful and needed work. On Sundays I often over heard the "little old ladies" of the church commenting on the cleanliness of the bathroom. I remember my subsequent feeling of pride. While not a glamorous work, my actions were helpful and appreciated by those who used the facilities. For providing this useful service I earned minimum wage in 1981, ($3.35 ...

August 28, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


Family’s tragedy: text less, live more

It is a potential killer whose numbers rival the deadly Ebola virus and it doesn't get near the attention it should. Unlike the dreaded illness currently ravaging West Africa this is one with a quick cure.

August 26, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


The new face of evil

As Hannah Arendt foresaw, we are once again up against the question of evil. An American photojournalist, James Foley, was presented to the camera and methodically decapitated. The instrument was not the ax reserved for royalty or the whooshing blade prompted by that reformer Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, but an ordinary looking knife. Death would be neither swift nor painless. This, somewhere in the bleached desert, was pure evil.

August 26, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Decision Pending on Newton’s Government Structure

The structure of county government is once again on the agenda of the Board of Commissioners (BOC), which has scheduled a work session for Aug. 26, 2014. As readers may recall, this has been a topic of discussion for several months and the BOC has met with experts from both the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) and the regional planning agency. Representatives of both clearly have indicated that the current "hybrid" system of having both a full time Commission needs to be changed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of county government.

August 23, 2014 | Larry McSwain | Columnists


50 years in newspaper industry

The other day I found myself thinking on how long I have been a part of the newspaper industry - it turns out that this will be my 50th year, with one year of my life working with mentally challenged adults and two working with people going into their final sunset, through Hospice.

August 23, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Films put Newton in the spotlight

This column is in response to several previous letters that have been submitted to The Covington News, to clarify what the facts are about the impact to our community concerning the film industry presence in Newton County.

November 21, 2010 | Hunter Hall Covington/Newton County Chamber of Commerce | Columnists


Grace Notes: See the place where God dwells

I rejoiced with drunkenness those who said to me, "Let us go to the house of the Lord" (Psalm 122:1).

November 19, 2010 | Jonathan E. Scharf | Columnists


Cutting more than waste

It looks like the midterm elections are going to lead to a witch hunt for government waste.

November 18, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Life better lived offline

I'm joining the raggedy-looking corps arrayed on the fringes of society who claim the end is nigh.

November 18, 2010 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Lost in transition

Rats. It looks as though I have not been selected to be a member of Gov.-elect Nathan Deal's transition team.

November 17, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


The News at your doorstep

It's easy to become deskbound at the workplace, but Saturday, The Covington News hit the road.

November 17, 2010 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


The 2012 Campaign starts here

Georgia's recent gubernatorial race was a no-win situation. I pretty much felt that I was choosing between the lesser of two evils.

November 14, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Hard times call for joint efforts

Yes, it's bad out there. People are hurting. Families are in crisis. No job, no home, no food. On a recent Monday, the clients' waiting room at the Community Food Pantry was standing-room only. FaithWorks just next door has cut its days of operation back due to the lack of financial resources to help more folks with rent and utilities.

November 14, 2010 | By Bob Furnad | Columnists


Terrorists are just criminals

Until the recent FedEx terrorism scare I never realized how cheap and easy it is to be an international terrorist.

November 12, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Power of one just isn’t enough

The power of one" is almost a modern-day mantra.

November 12, 2010 | By Barbara Morgan | Columnists


It’s Southern pride, battered and fried

My hero and professional role model, Chicago Tribune's Mike Royko, had an astounding piece recently. According to Royko, at an auto plant in Normal, Illinois, an executive asked the company that ran the plant's cafeteria to offer some more variety.

November 10, 2010 | Lewis Grizzard | Columnists


The man’s guide to the laundry room

The washer and dryer are two of the biggest and most dangerous machines anyone can own. So, why do most guys avoid the laundry room like they avoid a Tupperware party? I think it's because most men don't see the washer and dryer as "power tools." Well, that's got to change. Our wives would appreciate some help with the laundry, so I'm going to teach you how to operate those gigantic monsters.

November 10, 2010 | David McCoy | Columnists


What will it take to fix our borders?

The next time the illegal immigration advocates start whining about the poor Mexican workers coming into the United States to "do jobs we won't do" and to "make a better life for their families," please inform them that the porous borders between lawless Mexico and the U.S. are also letting in drugs at a scale almost beyond description and that Atlanta is a major distribution hub for the hombres.

November 10, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Father knows best on election

My first election memory is from 1974, when I was 7. President Nixon had recently resigned, succeeded by Gerald Ford. The Democratic Party picked up 49 seats in the House for a total of 291. In the Senate, the Democrats picked up four seats for 61 total. But for me, my memories are more personal. My father, Newt Gingrich, lost his first run for the Sixth Congressional District in Georgia.

November 07, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Of Alvin York and Armistice Day

One of the most unforgettable people I ever encountered was my eighth grade American history teacher. In 1964, Greensboro was so tiny that all grades were housed on the same campus, so he was familiar to everyone. But not until I was 13, and in his class, did I get to know a Tennessean with some Indian blood in him, Mr. G. M. Charles.

Now, the whole town knew Mr. Charles as assistant principal and football coach. But he was startling in appearance to young people, as his Indian features were exaggerated by the effects of an automobile wreck which ...

November 06, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


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