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Articles by Section - Columnists


Pumpkins growing weary

Can it be? Is it September already? One of my favorite tunes, "September Song," was written by Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson for a Broadway musical in 1938 called "Knickerbocker Holiday. The lyrics could apply today to the current political season in Georgia - "For it's a long, long time from May to December, but the days grow short when you reach September."

September 02, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Try realism in the Middle East

America rarely does time capsules anymore, but the ones it does should include videos from February 2011 of American TV reporters exulting in the triumph of the Arab Spring. "This is the sound of a people rising," ABC's Terry Moran told us from Cairo. For Egyptians, it was a day "when a people rose and made themselves a new country, a new world, a new life."

September 02, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Blacks must confront reality

Though racial discrimination exists, it is nowhere near the barrier it once was. The relevant question is: How much of what we see today can be explained by racial discrimination? This is an important question because if we conclude that racial discrimination is the major cause of black problems when it isn't, then effective solutions will be elusive forever. To begin to get a handle on the answer, let's pull up a few historical facts about black Americans.

August 30, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Time to call a spade a spade

As the character Cecily said to Miss Fairfax in a play written by Oscar Wilde entitled "The Importance of being Earnest": "When I see a spade I call it a spade."

August 30, 2014 | Mychal massie | Columnists


In 1970, we had a riot; Ferguson looks like war

The news from Ferguson, Missouri, has brought back unpleasant memories from the long-ago riots in Asbury Park, New Jersey. It was the summer of 1970, and I was a young teenager close enough to the action to be appropriately frightened.

August 28, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


The Value of Work and Labor Day

My first paying job was cleaning the bathrooms at the First Baptist Church of Carrollton, Georgia, where I was a member. I was 14, the minimum age for "children" to work. This was neither glamorous nor exciting work, but useful and needed work. On Sundays I often over heard the "little old ladies" of the church commenting on the cleanliness of the bathroom. I remember my subsequent feeling of pride. While not a glamorous work, my actions were helpful and appreciated by those who used the facilities. For providing this useful service I earned minimum wage in 1981, ($3.35 ...

August 28, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


Family’s tragedy: text less, live more

It is a potential killer whose numbers rival the deadly Ebola virus and it doesn't get near the attention it should. Unlike the dreaded illness currently ravaging West Africa this is one with a quick cure.

August 26, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


The new face of evil

As Hannah Arendt foresaw, we are once again up against the question of evil. An American photojournalist, James Foley, was presented to the camera and methodically decapitated. The instrument was not the ax reserved for royalty or the whooshing blade prompted by that reformer Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, but an ordinary looking knife. Death would be neither swift nor painless. This, somewhere in the bleached desert, was pure evil.

August 26, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Decision Pending on Newton’s Government Structure

The structure of county government is once again on the agenda of the Board of Commissioners (BOC), which has scheduled a work session for Aug. 26, 2014. As readers may recall, this has been a topic of discussion for several months and the BOC has met with experts from both the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia (ACCG) and the regional planning agency. Representatives of both clearly have indicated that the current "hybrid" system of having both a full time Commission needs to be changed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of county government.

August 23, 2014 | Larry McSwain | Columnists


50 years in newspaper industry

The other day I found myself thinking on how long I have been a part of the newspaper industry - it turns out that this will be my 50th year, with one year of my life working with mentally challenged adults and two working with people going into their final sunset, through Hospice.

August 23, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Legislation moving forward

It's now at the point in the legislative session where the General Assembly is pushing into the phase where we press to move bills out of each chamber (House and Senate) and over to the other before crossover day. Crossover day is legislative day 30, the last day we can pass a bill out of one chamber and still be able to move it in the other.

March 06, 2011 | By Doug Holt | Columnists


Harwell: Things I know no longer matter

The older I get the more I feel that a good bit of information I've spent a lifetime accumulating may border on the insignificant. I hope I'm wrong, as it's a terrible thing to contemplate having expended enormous effort and priceless, irreplaceable time in the pursuit of knowledge which doesn't matter. But it's important to me, especially in winter, to know that the hot water won't reach the shower head until I've sung the horn line introduction to Sam and Dave's 1967 "Soul Man."

March 06, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


SPLOST paves way to growth for county

Many of you reading this will remember when Newton County was primarily an agricultural community where cotton, orchards, hay fields, cattle, dairies and family gardens dominated the landscape. Others will cherish memories of those days as related by parents and grandparents. Roads that linked farms and homesteads were rutted dirt roads, even the most well-traveled.

March 06, 2011 | By Billy Fortson | Columnists


Cushman: Liberty or bondage?

My 11-year-old daughter asked me to explain how Wisconsin's 14 Democratic state senators can leave the state while they are supposed to be working.

March 06, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Drug war?

I was puzzled by the news of a DEA raid in Atlanta last week. Not that they found drugs and drug dealers in Atlanta. Those are almost as common a peanuts and peaches in Georgia.

March 04, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Morgan: Family matters

The word "family" usually evokes only the warmest and fondest feelings of which we are capable.

March 04, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: Not the image we want to project

Joe Cannelongo is a halfback.

March 02, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: Some good news, sort of

It is not easy being a house husband cum columnist. Trying to figure out where the paper towels are located at the same time I am trying to figure out where the commas go makes my brain hurt.

March 02, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cushman: A mad, mad, mad, mad world

Protests in Tunisia spread to Egypt, which led to the flight of Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak and will lead to who knows what type of government in the end.

February 27, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Tudor: Winner depends on who’s keeping score

As the Georgia legislature begins its march to the halfway mark, few significant pieces of legislation have been dealt with.

February 27, 2011 | Jim Tudor Guest Columnist | Columnists


Harwell: The few, the proud

Every once in a blue moon a television commercial will appear which actually causes me to stop and pay attention. One which does so features United States Marines in dress uniform, executing a rifle drill. As the recruiting message is heard, the line of Marines is shown extending through treasured, prominent American landmarks, from sea to shining sea. The commercial ends as the picture goes to black, with only the loud clack of rifles being handled continuing, thus signifying eternal vigilance by this proud Corps.

February 27, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Weadick: SPLOST investment in community

There has been substantial debate regarding the proposed Newton County Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax, or SPLOST, over the past weeks and months, but the merits of passing a six-year extension to the 1 percent county sales tax are difficult to ignore, namely the $57 million in funding for vital public works and programs in our community.

February 27, 2011 | James Weadick Guest Columnist | Columnists


A tale of two lessons

In his book "The Global Achievement Gap," Harvard Professor Tony Wagner maintains that a "learning walk" through leading suburban high schools will reveal what he calls the "hidden gap."

February 25, 2011 | By Gary Mathews | Columnists


Morgan: These days the world’s in a whirl

The world - this planet - is said to be increasing its speed of spinning and also rotating on its axis.

February 25, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: It’s up to us all to eliminate litter

My haul was 15 pounds.

February 23, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


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