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The PSC should learn how to say ‘no’

Imagine that you are the loan officer at the local community bank.

May 01, 2016 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


Trump's triumph

Donald Trump's commanding win this week of all five of the Republican primaries provides him with enormous momentum for the final six weeks of ...

May 01, 2016 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Dog days of summer

The ancient Romans coined the phrase "dog days" based on the period of time that the brightest star (Sirius, the Dog Star) rose and set in conjunction with the sun. The Romans believed that Sirius radiated heat to the Earth, causing the hottest part of the year as it traveled with the sun.

July 19, 2015 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Stock Exchange closure highlights value of freedom

Many years ago, I visited Cambodia with my family. One day, a local resident took us to a small village of 53 huts far off the beaten path. In many ways, it was closer to the 13th century than the 21st. It was truly an eye-opening experience.

July 12, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Fiddling away the future

Let's list major problems affecting black Americans. Topping the list is the breakdown in the black family, where only a third of black children are raised in two-parent households. Actually, the term "breakdown" is incorrect. Families do not form in the first place. Nationally, there is a black illegitimacy rate of 72 percent. In some urban areas, the percentage is much greater. Blacks constitute more than 50 percent of murder victims, where roughly 7,000 blacks are murdered each year. Ninety-five percent of the time, the perpetrator is another black. If a black youngster does graduate from high school ...

July 12, 2015 | Walter Williams | Columnists


The value of work

"Hide not your talents, they for use were made, what's a sundial in the shade?" -- Benjamin Franklin

July 12, 2015 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


They are troubled by Trump

In 1980, the Republicans saw six members of Congress run for president. They were joined by three former governors and the former congressman turned United Nations ambassador turned envoy to China turned RNC chairman turned CIA Director George H.W. Bush. Ronald Reagan, the former governor of California, won that year and picked Bush as his running mate. The 2016 Republican primary has the deepest bench of candidates since that year.

July 12, 2015 | Eric Erickson | Columnists


Freedom First!

The Fourth of July we celebrate this weekend heralds a document proclaiming both our nation's independence and our unwavering commitment to freedom.

July 05, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Constitutional ignorance and dereliction

The nation's demagogues and constitutionally ignorant are using the Charleston, South Carolina, AME church shooting to attack the Second Amendment's "right of the people to keep and bear Arms." A couple of years ago, President Barack Obama said, "I have a profound respect for the traditions of hunting that trace back in this country for generations."

July 05, 2015 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Mass Hysteria in America

In the 1400s, a nun in a French convent started making sounds like a cat. Other nuns began to do the same. Eventually, they started biting one another. As word of the bitings spread, so, too, did the bitings. They swept through other convents all the way to Rome.

July 05, 2015 | Erick Erickson | Columnists


Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution's vice president of university affairs.

July 05, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution's vice president of university affairs.

July 05, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Charleston's compassion

A black church, a maladjusted white kid, and the nation moaning, "My God, not again." A few selected politicians, firm believers in the theory of 'never let a good crisis go to waste', exploited the tragedy to push for more gun control on law abiding citizens. Shame on them. Thankfully, the majority of politicians did the decent thing by grieving with the rest of the country and graciously keeping their mouths shut. Condolences and heart-felt words for the fallen were and always will be a proper and suitable way to express sympathy for a heartbreak such as Charleston.

June 28, 2015 | Pete Mecca | Columnists


Prejudice wrong belief system, but not part of country's DNA

Long before last week's killings in Charleston, South Carolina, which appear to have been motivated by racial hatred, at least one expert in belief systems wrote that a person's prejudices can be changed.

June 28, 2015 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Five young men can define a successful life

Five young men, ages 18 to 23. Two college graduates. Two currently attending college. The youngest headed that way this fall. All good students. All excellent athletes. All standing resolutely before a large assemblage to pay tribute to their grandfather, Rob Neely, who passed away recently after a courageous battle with cancer. And what a tribute it was.

June 28, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


States don’t have rights, people have rights

Next week, we'll be celebrating the 239th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The eloquent cries for freedom and equality voiced in that properly revered document have become what professors Sid Milkis and Marc Landy call the "American Creed." It's a belief that all of us have the right to do whatever we want with our lives so long as we don't interfere with the right of others to do the same.

June 28, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


You're what you say you are

Rachel A. Dolezal, the recently resigned president of the Spokane, Washington, office of the NAACP, has come under a bit of controversy. Both of her parents are white, but for eight years, Dolezal claimed that she was black. In addition to her role as president of an NAACP chapter, Dolezal was an instructor of Africana studies at Eastern Washington University.

June 28, 2015 | Walter Williams | Columnists


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