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Articles by Section - Columnists


Let’s not go too far

Let me begin by saying that I regard Randy Vinson as intelligent, articulate, insightful and a sincerely good person, but I never forget Randy is a planner with one concept of how the world should be planned.

June 26, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


All Senate — all the time

It's an off-year election, and the White House is securely in the Democratic camp for two more years. That means the focus is turning instead to down-ballot races.

June 26, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: The enigmatic war

This is a splendid time to remember the First World War. It started 100 years ago this month with the June 28 shooting of the Austrian archduke and his wife. By the end of the summer, much of Europe was engaged in a war that lasted about four years, toppled four empires, precipitated the communist revolution, created by fiat the modern Middle East, recognized Zionism, made the U.S. a world power and cost the lives of about 10 million fighting men. Historians are still trying to figure out what happened.

June 24, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Yarbrough: Retired general sees hope in future Iraqi generations

In my home hangs a photograph of a rather large and deep hole on the side of an asphalt road. It is the aftermath of an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) - or in more simple terms, a homemade bomb - that went off just as the Humvee in which I was riding passed over it.

June 24, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Cushman: Traditions, time and treasure

ROME - Birthdays have always been a big deal in my family. When I was growing up, the birthday girl (or man, in the case of my father) would be regaled with a rendition of "Happy Birthday" during breakfast. The special attention continued throughout the day and included letting the honoree choose the dinner menu and being the center of family conversation. Birthdays were not about presents, but about being the center of attention.

June 19, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Massie: It will be different with a white, Christian, conservative president

For We the People, Obama's time in office has thus far been tantamount to a march through hell with the complete deconstruction of America strapped to our backs, and with despair and immiseration clinched in our teeth. And for the privilege of being unwilling participants in this death march, Obama believes we should be grateful. Obama has usurped and overrun Congressional authority in less time than it took for the Kudzu vine to overrun the South.

June 19, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Cohen: For Obama, the wages of doing nothing

Whose fault is the current debacle in Iraq? It could be Nouri al-Maliki's since he is the country's strongman and has alienated the minority Sunnis. It could be George W. Bush's because he started the whole thing off with possibly the stupidest war in history, the Children's Crusade exempted on account of youth. The one person who is not at fault, we are told over and over again, is the current president of the United States. Like Millard Fillmore, he has kept us out of war.

June 17, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Yarbrough: If heaven is out of the question, any day in Athens will do

I have said it before but it bears repeating: If I don't qualify for heaven (a distinct possibility), my preferred alternates are: (a.) Athens, Georgia, on a crisp fall Saturday afternoon; (b.) Athens, Georgia, on a warm spring day or (c.) Athens, Georgia, on any day. As you no doubt know, Athens is home to my alma mater, the University of Georgia, the oldest state-chartered university in all the land.

June 17, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Williams: Who owns you?

Darcy Olsen, president of the Arizona-based Goldwater Institute, and Richard Garr, president of Neuralstem, a biotech company, wrote "Right to Try experimental drugs" in USA Today (5/28/2014). They pointed out that "this year, more than 5,000 Americans will lose their battle with ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease." Up until recently, there was no medicine on the market that significantly improved the lives of ALS patients. But now there is one in clinical trials that holds considerable promise, but it has not been granted Food and Drug Administration approval. The average amount of time it ...

June 14, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Father’s Day for father figures

One of the issues facing you if you're a baby boomer is something that pills and exercise won't help. If your parents are still alive, they're still 18-plus years older than you.

June 14, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Dive deep to find the gift of connection

"Driven to Distraction" is no longer just a title to a book that covers ADHD, but it is also a phrase that describes how many of us feel in our day-to-day lives. The opportunities and choices are enormous and they can easily overwhelm our capacity to make order out of our everyday world.

June 12, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Only BO knows what made Bergdahl so important

On Tuesday, June 3, I wrote: "Obama is a man on the ropes. He is coming more unhinged. Only a person with deep-seated emotional instability makes the public displays he does. Only a person teetering on the brink of emotional collapse continues to make fallacious statements and then attempts to downplay them by claiming even greater lies." (See: No More Tinkles Down Leg of Chris Matthews)

June 12, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


What’s that lawmaker saying?

As with many other fields of endeavor, being a legislator requires getting to know some slang. Herewith is a brief primer of some Georgia General Assembly terms and phrases.

June 10, 2014 | Doug Holt | Columnists


The changing faces of war

I am into my summer routine, which means I drive to a weekend house, and as I do so, I listen to a book on tape. For the moment, it's Laura Hillenbrand's riveting "Unbroken," the story of Louis Zamperini's ordeal during World War II. He was a bombardier, and after his plane went down in the Pacific, he spent 47 days on a decaying raft, fighting off sharks with his fists, and then survived three years of inhumane imprisonment by the Japanese. His and the lives of other POWs were saved by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima ...

June 10, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


A salute to a man who achieved his dream

Before the start of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games, Billy Payne, the organization's CEO, reminded everyone that while much of the attention during the games would be focused on the high-profile athletes, not to forget that all 10,000 athletes from the 107 countries represented were and would forever be Olympians - a title very few people in the world would ever attain.

June 10, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Petty annoyances

Most who read my columns think that I'm only annoyed by politicians, growing government and Americans who have little respect or love for liberty and our Constitution. There are other things that annoy me.

June 07, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


15 minutes of fame with no O.J.

I read someplace that everyone at one time or another has his or her 15 minutes of fame. I don't know if that is true or not but I did have a moment in the national spotlight once and of all the good things that I have ever done which could have brought that famous 15 minutes into my life, I earned mine for just having fun.

June 07, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


One plan doesn't fit all

I read with fascination the opinion piece written by Randy Vinson Sunday titled "What Legacy?'. It correctly points out the pride we all feel about the area we call the Square in Covington.

June 05, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Remembering D-Day

This year marks the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, and the long-awaited opening of a western front.

June 05, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


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