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Articles by Section - Columnists


Father’s Day for father figures

One of the issues facing you if you're a baby boomer is something that pills and exercise won't help. If your parents are still alive, they're still 18-plus years older than you.

June 14, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Dive deep to find the gift of connection

"Driven to Distraction" is no longer just a title to a book that covers ADHD, but it is also a phrase that describes how many of us feel in our day-to-day lives. The opportunities and choices are enormous and they can easily overwhelm our capacity to make order out of our everyday world.

June 12, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Only BO knows what made Bergdahl so important

On Tuesday, June 3, I wrote: "Obama is a man on the ropes. He is coming more unhinged. Only a person with deep-seated emotional instability makes the public displays he does. Only a person teetering on the brink of emotional collapse continues to make fallacious statements and then attempts to downplay them by claiming even greater lies." (See: No More Tinkles Down Leg of Chris Matthews)

June 12, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


What’s that lawmaker saying?

As with many other fields of endeavor, being a legislator requires getting to know some slang. Herewith is a brief primer of some Georgia General Assembly terms and phrases.

June 10, 2014 | Doug Holt | Columnists


The changing faces of war

I am into my summer routine, which means I drive to a weekend house, and as I do so, I listen to a book on tape. For the moment, it's Laura Hillenbrand's riveting "Unbroken," the story of Louis Zamperini's ordeal during World War II. He was a bombardier, and after his plane went down in the Pacific, he spent 47 days on a decaying raft, fighting off sharks with his fists, and then survived three years of inhumane imprisonment by the Japanese. His and the lives of other POWs were saved by the atomic bombing of Hiroshima ...

June 10, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


A salute to a man who achieved his dream

Before the start of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games, Billy Payne, the organization's CEO, reminded everyone that while much of the attention during the games would be focused on the high-profile athletes, not to forget that all 10,000 athletes from the 107 countries represented were and would forever be Olympians - a title very few people in the world would ever attain.

June 10, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Petty annoyances

Most who read my columns think that I'm only annoyed by politicians, growing government and Americans who have little respect or love for liberty and our Constitution. There are other things that annoy me.

June 07, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


15 minutes of fame with no O.J.

I read someplace that everyone at one time or another has his or her 15 minutes of fame. I don't know if that is true or not but I did have a moment in the national spotlight once and of all the good things that I have ever done which could have brought that famous 15 minutes into my life, I earned mine for just having fun.

June 07, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


One plan doesn't fit all

I read with fascination the opinion piece written by Randy Vinson Sunday titled "What Legacy?'. It correctly points out the pride we all feel about the area we call the Square in Covington.

June 05, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Remembering D-Day

This year marks the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, and the long-awaited opening of a western front.

June 05, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Sea Island company defends proposed development

I wrote recently about the concerns of environmental groups over a proposal by the owners of Sea Island to develop 7.2 acres on the south end of the island. They say that the land is too fragile for the proposed development.

June 03, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Talking himself into a corner

Like a pitcher who has lost his fastball, Barack Obama has lost "the speech." The speech has always been central to the president and his presidency. He established his credentials with the one he delivered to the 2004 Democratic National Convention while still a state senator. He followed that with many others - Berlin, Cairo, Philadelphia on race, etc. - each one greeted with bobby soxer delirium, which Obama fully expected. In 2004, just before he spoke to the convention, he told his friend Marty Nesbitt that the excitement about him was yet to peak. "My speech is pretty good," he allowed.

June 03, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Catholic school days remembered

With graduation just a few days behind us, it brought my own days in school to mind.

May 31, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Summer fun and friendship

For those of us with school-age children, May Madness is almost over. No longer simply a time for tests, projects and wrapping up work before the end of the school year, May has become a time for year-end celebrations, ceremonies and get-togethers. May is the new December in terms of over-scheduled activities and events.

May 29, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Appalling disregard for black life by other blacks

Late one night last week I was channel surfing when I happened upon a station that was running a marathon of a reality show. Each hour-long program took the viewers through the real-time aftermath of two violent murders. Sometimes each murder was solved, with the perpetrator being arrested and imprisoned. Other times, the crimes went unsolved by the conclusion of the program.

May 29, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


The high price of isolationism

This being the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War I, I have plunged into several books on the subject, most of them relating to what started it, and I have come up with the following conclusion: mustaches. Most of Europe's leaders had either a mustache or a beard -- the German kaiser, the jejune Wilhelm II, had the most resplendent mustache of them all, "fixed into place every morning by his personal barber," Margaret McMillan tells us in her new history of the road to war. This confirms what I always thought: The Germans started the war.

February 06, 2014 | Richard Cohen Columnist | Columnists


The pause that refreshes during dull Super Bowl

Two ads are seared into my memory from childhood. One is by Keep America Beautiful for Earth Day in 1970. The commercial portrayed what appeared to be an American Indian crying over the pollution that littered our country. Later, we found out the actor was neither an Indian nor really crying.

February 06, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


The annual State of the Column

My fellow Georgians, in order to keep my national certification as a modest and much-beloved columnist, it is a requirement that I submit to you annually a State of the Column message. This I do today. (Yea! Clap! Clap! Clap!)

February 04, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Nimbers show D.C. theory at odds with reality

A theoretical listing of the best states put together by a publication for Washington insiders rates New Hampshire as the best state in the union, and finds that nine of the 10 worst states are in the American South.

February 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


The politics of envy and hatred

Part of the progressive agenda is to create hate and envy. One component of that agenda is to attack the large differences between a corporation chief executive officer's earnings and those of its average worker. CNNMoney published salary comparisons in "Fortune 50 CEO pay vs. our salaries". Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf's annual salary is $2.8 million. CNN shows that it takes 66 Wells Fargo employees, whose average salary is $42,400, to match Stumpf's salary. It takes 57 Wal-Mart employees, who earn $22,100 on average, to match CEO Michael Duke's $1.3 million ...

February 01, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Success traits that drive us

As parents of two middle-schoolers (eighth grade and sixth), my husband and I spend time attempting to help them develop characteristics that we believe are useful and good.

January 30, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Our desperate quagmire in Afghanistan

While watching the utterly gripping movie "Lone Survivor" recently, I comforted myself by noting that the four Navy SEALs engaged in a desperate firefight with the Afghan Taliban were all volunteers. They asked for this, I told myself. They were not draftees yanked out of civilian life and compelled to fight a war they could neither understand nor win. They had asked for this, I insisted, but I knew all the time that this was a lie. They had volunteered, but certainly not to die and certainly for no purpose.

January 30, 2014 | Richard Cohen Columnist | Columnists


Legislators want to give us 'Guns for God'

American humorist Will Rogers once said, "I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts." Ol' Will would have loved the Georgia Legislature. They are the gift that keeps on giving.

January 28, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Will Georgia say 'yes' to medical marijuana?

Can it be that the state Georgia might stop saying no to medical marijuana?

January 28, 2014 | Dorothy Frazier Piedrahita Staff writer | Columnists


Massie: Skin color's still important in politics

Today the idea of not being judged by the color of one's skin but being judged by the content of one's character is as farcical as the idea of unicorns. Judging based on color of skin is exactly the barometer race-mongers and racialists measure with today; content of character be damned.

January 25, 2014 | Mychal Massie Columnist | Columnists


Williams: free to feel sorry for whites

At one time in our nation's history, blacks feeling sorry for whites was verboten. That was portrayed in Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird." This is a novel published in 1960 -- and later made into a movie -- about Depression-era racial relations in the Deep South. The novel's character Tom Robinson, a black man, portrayed in the movie by Brock Peters, is on trial, falsely accused of raping a white woman. The prosecuting attorney, while grilling Robinson, asks him why he spent so much time doing chores for the alleged rape victim when he had ...

January 25, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Mind-blowing research may save lives

My mother's father died of cancer before I was born. My mother was pregnant with me, but had not told her father that she was to have a second child. The story I've been told is that they opened him up to remove the cancer -- and found it everywhere. They closed him back up and sent him home to die.

January 23, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Forget marijuana, what about cigarettes?

On Jan. 1, Colorado began permitting the legal sale of marijuana. Even before that, the nation's news media had swung into action, arguing just about everything -- marijuana is dangerous or not dangerous, a gateway drug or just a lot of smoke. Nothing I saw mentioned why I, for one, will not smoke marijuana. I'm afraid it would lead me back to cigarettes.

January 23, 2014 | Richard Cohen Columnist | Columnists


Why live longer without banana pudding?

I read a news report this week that says while we are living a lot longer in the U.S., people in other countries are living even longer. Bummer.

January 21, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


In era of rampant bullying, parents must take action

The Jan. 15 edition of The Covington News featured a story that saddened me for many reasons.

January 21, 2014 | Dorothy Piedrahita Columnist | Columnists


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