View Mobile Site

Articles by Section - Columnists


Cohen: Exonerating the criminals

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's anti-Semitism is getting the better of him. Once again, the Turkish prime minister has trotted out the Hitler analogy in relation to Israel and what it has done in Gaza. "They curse Hitler morning and night," he said of the Israelis. "However, now their barbarism has surpassed even Hitler's."

July 29, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Opposition to Hobby Lobby decision highlights problem with mandates

Following the Hobby Lobby Supreme Court decision, one of the key talking points that emerged from enraged opponents of the ruling was: "My boss shouldn't be involved in my health care decisions." California State Senate candidate Sandra Fluke says on her official website that such a perspective is "common sense."

July 26, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Do blacks need favors?

Earlier this month, the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act was celebrated. During the act's legislative debate, then-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, responding to predictions, promised, "I'll eat my hat if this leads to racial quotas." I don't know whether Humphrey got around to keeping his promise, but here's my question: Is it within the capacity of black Americans to make it in this society without the special favors variously called racial preferences, quotas, affirmative action and race-sensitive policies? What might a "yes" answer to that question assume and imply about blacks? Likewise, what would a "no ...

July 26, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Cohen: A fight for Israel’s existence

Israel fought its first war, in 1948, against five Arab nations - Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan - as well as the Palestinians. In the prediction of the fairly new CIA, the outcome was never in doubt: "Without substantial outside aid in terms of manpower and material, they [the Jews] will be able to hold out no longer than two years." It has now been 66 years, but I fear that sooner or later, the CIA's conclusion could turn out to be right.

July 24, 2014 | | Columnists


Johnson: Getting on the same page of the 2050 Plan

Last week I attended two informal meetings of citizens and two Chamber of Commerce moderated meetings on the 2050 Plan and a meeting on the Highway 278 Community Improvement District. I came away with an appreciation of just how similar is the end result most of us want for Newton County and yet how distant are the means that we would employ to accomplish that end.

July 22, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Dream home to house from hell

I wrote this some time ago. With so many folks in the same boat as I was in those early days of my adulthood, I thought you might get a chuckle from my young eager mistakes:

July 19, 2014 | Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Virtues require underlying framework

This summer has served as a reminder to me about the virtue of virtues, specifically hard work and perseverance. Last winter, our 12-year-old son, Robert, was accepted into an honors performance group as a string bass player, based on his teacher's recommendation and an MP3 submission of his playing. In May, he was sent four pieces of music to master by late June, when he was to perform them in New York.

July 17, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Williams: Spending and morality

During last year's budget negotiation meetings, President Barack Obama told House Speaker John Boehner, "We don't have a spending problem." When Boehner responded with "But, Mr. President, we have a very serious spending problem," Obama replied, "I'm getting tired of hearing you say that." In one sense, the president is right. What's being called a spending problem is really a symptom of an unappreciated deep-seated national moral rot. Let's examine it with a few questions.

July 17, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: The job of waxing poetic can be quite frenetic

"I have gotten bad news and am much the worse for it.

July 15, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Conservatives will buy anything

They had a term for her, but I've forgotten it. It was a name applied to a person who could not say no to a door-to-door salesman. The one I remember from my brief career selling magazines was totally upfront about her intentions. "I'll buy whatever you're selling," she said. I sold her Esquire and two other subscriptions. Salesmen back then had a name for such people. Today, I would call them conservatives. They, too, will buy anything.

July 15, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Political language, not Watergate, to blame for public distrust of government

In his weekly column for CNN.com, Julian Zelizer makes a reasonable case that "Distrustful Americans still live in age of Watergate." In his eyes, this helps explain why the president's health care law and other initiatives have encountered so much resistance.

July 12, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Adventures in Elizabeth City

One of the advantages of being an older baby boomer is that your mind can easily wander back to days of your youth and every detail of those experiences can be seen as clearly as if you were still that age.

July 12, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: President Obama should go down to the border

Based on this fiscal year's eight-and-a-half months of activity so far, the number of unaccompanied alien children from Honduras apprehended by the U.S. Border Patrol will increase 22 times from what it was in 2009.

July 10, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Massie: What if terrorists used infectious diseases?

In a piece titled, "They're Not Telling Us The Truth," I wrote: "Clinton, Bush and Obama, et al, have positioned us in harm's way by providing an accommodating environment for these illegal disease carriers. It is not my contention that everyone who crosses the border illegally is diseased or a disease carrier. I am saying, the fact that we do not know which ones are and which ones are not puts us in peril...I confess that when I walk into an uptown restaurant and see illegals in the kitchen or busing tables, I am concerned." (mychal-massie.com ...

July 10, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Yarbrough: When it comes to polls and pests, Junior E. Lee knows his business

With the July 22 runoff elections fast approaching, I called Junior E. Lee, general manager of the Yarbrough Worldwide Media and Pest Control Company, located in Greater Garfield, Georgia, to get his thoughts on the various races and to see who he thinks will make it to the finals of the November general election and who will be eliminated this round.

July 08, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


1 2 3 4  Next »  Last »

Page 3 of 4

Archive By Section - Columnists


Newton Board of Commissioners: Making Progress?

On April 26, 2014, the Newton County Board of Commissioners (BOC) met for its second work session to discuss the structure of county government. For those who have not followed this issue closely, the BOC is currently operating under a county manager form of government that is contrary to the county's charter, which is also called its "enabling legislation." The current charter calls for a full time commission chairman to be the county's chief executive officer rather than that role being filled by a county manager. Recent action by the BOC to appoint a "county manager in waiting ...

May 06, 2014 | Larry McSwain | Columnists


Racial bigotry decreasing with each generation

For the past week, instead of the major media writing about the economy, worrying about the apparent lying in our federal government or bringing to light proper care of veterans, it has focused its attention on Donald Sterling, the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers.

May 03, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


One veteran’s viewpoint

The seniors in our 1965 Bartlett High School class were archetypal of the era, anxious to graduate and make our mark in the world or take advantage of parental aspirations desiring their baby-boomer cherubs to earn another sheepskin at the college level. Vietnam was an obscure apprehension, except for a few senior boys that received an induction notice from Uncle Sam.

May 03, 2014 | Pete Mecca | Columnists


Hot long summer

June 21 is officially the first day of summer, but - as happens during any election year - the heat is going to set in well before then. It's going to be a long, hot spring and an even longer, hotter summer.

May 01, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Hamas' outrageous charter

Israel's Holocaust Remembrance Day has passed. But then, as far as I'm concerned, it is always Holocaust Remembrance Day - a perpetual and frustratingly futile attempt to come to terms with murder so vast and incomprehensible it is like pondering what came before the Big Bang. And yet in a corner of the world, the Holocaust is considered no mystery at all. The Jews did it to themselves to foster the creation of Israel. This is what Hamas believes.

May 01, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Sen. Chip Rogers ‘dream job’ at gpb goes ‘poof’

The scene: The office of Teya Ryan, president of GPB.

April 29, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


A supreme need for educational diversity

In 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ended legal segregation in public schools with a unanimous 9-0 decision in Brown v. Board of Education. While the ruling paved the way for future integration of American society, the court itself was far from integrated. The decision was reached by nine white men.

April 29, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Never forgotten

History refers to a particular confederation of GIs as veterans of "The Forgotten War," a war that tested the very best America could field, both experienced and untried.

April 29, 2014 | Pete Mecca | Columnists


The rusty mental camera

I love to explore historical towns. I especially enjoy comparing old town photos to the current locations. Hanging on the walls in Gritz Family Restaurant in McDonough are photos of the old city. Could some of my relatives be in these photos? The specific picture I examined was an aerial photo covering a huge swath of the town square.

April 29, 2014 | David McCoy | Columnists


Spring is in the air, I’m in the garden

Spring in Covington is always a gorgeous sight. The dogwoods, other flowering trees and azaleas all put on quite a show.

April 29, 2014 | Paula Travis | Columnists


Times they are a-changin’

It's amazing, in a short 68 years since the beginning of the baby boomer age, how attitudes and meanings have changed so dramatically.

April 26, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Wage Discrimination

"President Obama vows zero tolerance on gender wage gap," read one headline. Another read, "Women still earned 77 cents on men's dollar in 2012." It's presumed that big, greedy corporations are responsible for what is seen as wage injustice. Before discussing the "unjust" wage differences between men and women, let's acknowledge an even greater injustice - which no one seems to care about - age injustice.

April 26, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Earth Day

This week marks the 44th anniversary of Earth Day. In years past, the day has been marked with great media fanfare and attention. This week, it marched by with little mention. This is not so much a reflection of any lack of interest in the Earth, but a reflection of how mainstream and ongoing the topics of recycling, reclaiming and sustainability have become. They are now part of our daily lives, rather than a topic to be raised once a year.

April 24, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Familiar parallels in Ukraine

Is Andranik Migranyan right?

April 24, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Proposed sea island development awash with controversy

The Sea Island Company wants to build a group of condominiu1ms on what many people believe to be environmentally unsound ground. Why should you care?

April 22, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


« First  « Prev  2 3 4 5 6  Next »  Last »

Page 4 of 103


Please wait ...