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Scholar-athlete charade

Last year's column "Dishonest Educators" (1/9/2013) reported on the largest school cheating scandal in U.S. history. In more than three-quarters of the 56 Atlanta schools investigated, teachers changed student answers on academic achievement tests. Cheating orders came directly from school administrators. The cheating was brazen. One teacher told a colleague, "I had to give your kids, or your students, the answers because they're dumb as hell." Atlanta's not alone. Teacher cheating has been discovered in other cities, such as Philadelphia, Houston, New York, Detroit, Baltimore, Los Angeles and Washington.

November 08, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Peace before sunset

Last week a neighbor friend passed on to his own personal sunset.

November 08, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Getting stuff done

Prognosticators are predicting a Republican takeover of the United States Senate, and a pickup of a few seats in the House of Representatives. Driven in large part by the unpopularity of President Barack Obama (latest Gallup poll 42 percent approve, 53 percent disapprove of Obama), this potential change in control provides both an opportunity and a risk for Republicans.

November 01, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Rasmussen: Election 2014 in context

Political pundits often miss the forest for the trees, and it's amazing how things look when you pause for a moment to look at the broader context of the 2014 midterm elections. The short-term discussion among political junkies is all about whether Republicans can win control of the Senate and just how many seats they will win.

November 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Africa, A Tragic Continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

November 01, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: A salute to one trying to make this a better world

A wise man once said that our only reason for occupying space on this earth is to leave things better than we found them. Unfortunately, not enough of us will. Len Pagano is an exception.

November 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Africa: A tragic continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

October 27, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


The power of positive beliefs

My mother was diagnosed with uterine cancer in the mid-1970s, when I was in grammar school. Her goal, at that time, was to stay alive to see my older sister Kathy and me graduate from high school. She neither dwelled on the disease, nor on why she was stricken with it, but instead focused on getting rid of the cancer and living for her two daughters.

October 25, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich-Cushman | Columnists


Ben Bradlee was a leader and a friend

Ben Bradlee would not have liked me to say so, but he was the living refutation of the Declaration of Independence: All men are not created equal. Certainly, he was not. He was born rich and well-connected, a member of the WASP tribe that once ran much of America and nearly all of its prestigious institutions. He was compellingly handsome and so smart that no crossword puzzle could really challenge him. It's not that he didn't have a weakness. He did. He was a sucker for the underdog.

October 25, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Embarrassing economists

So as to give some perspective, I'm going to ask readers for their guesses about human behavior before explaining my embarrassment by some of my fellow economists.

October 25, 2014 | Walter E. Williams | Columnists


Gov. Deal pledges 'everything on the table' public education reform

Last week Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter shared via this column his vision for public education in Georgia.

October 25, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Americans love community, hate politics

To understand the lack of enthusiasm most Americans feel about the midterm elections, it's important to recognize a vital distinction between government and community.

October 25, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Cushman: Exercise, routine and life

While new and novel might be exciting, routine and habit can help create a structure and framework for success. From eating breakfast, brushing our teeth or exercising every day, much of our lives are driven by routine. This reliance on routine behavior can startle us when we are driving and find ourselves not at our planned destination, but at our routine destination.

October 18, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: A president lacking menace

Tell me something: What do you think would happen if the United States concludes that Iran has been cheating and delaying and is about to pop a fully functional nuclear weapons program? Would President Obama respond by joining Israel to bomb the Iranian nuclear facilities to smithereens - or would he stall and equivocate? My bet is the latter and so, just to double down, is what I bet the Iranians are betting. They have taken the measure of Obama. He lacks menace.

October 18, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


Williams: Officially killing Americans

The Food and Drug Administration can make two types of errors. It can approve a drug that has dangerous unanticipated side effects, or it can reject or delay approval of a drug that is safe and effective. Let's look at these errors, because to err on the side of under- or over-caution is costly.

October 18, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Yarbrough: Political landscape unchanged by weather

Last week you would have thought we were living in two different states. North of the Gnat Line, it seemed like Siberia. Even possums and yard dogs were hugging each other trying to stay warm.

January 19, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Latarski: Responsible justice

Even before 'Taps' faded from Georgia State Trooper Chadwick LeCory's funeral people were wondering how Gregory Favor, a man with an extensive criminal record, could be out of jail to - allegedly - perpetrate such an act.

January 16, 2011 | Ric Latarski | Columnists


Cushman: Power of prayer crosses party lines

It's the third consecutive day that we have been snowed in. I had thought that I would have time to read, reflect and get organized while my two children frolicked in the snow. Instead, my days have been filled with cooking meals, cleaning up and doing laundry after changing wet, dirty, snowy clothes into wearable garments. We have gone through almost 3 gallons of milk making hot chocolate.

January 16, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Harwell: Taken for Granted

There's a scene in the epic World War II film, "Saving Private Ryan," that always gets me. The Tom Hanks character, Capt. Miller, at D-Day plus three, having endured 45 of his men killed and 90 wounded knocking out Nazi artillery pieces, has been summoned to company headquarters, away from the action, for reassignment. While awaiting orders, the battle-weary captain takes in the surroundings. Nearby, a soldier casually shaves with water heated over a fire, while a companion chows down on a freshly made Dagwood-style sandwich.

January 15, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Durusau: You get what you pay for

The recent snow-followed-by-ice storm was unusual for our area.

January 14, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Giddens: Snow makes for wet blanket

Kids and canines love snow.

January 13, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: Faster not always better

To Nicholas Wansley and Brian and Thomas Yarbrough:

January 11, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Business not as usual for Congress

"My first memory of a congressional swearing in dates to Jan. 3, 1979, when members of the 96th Congress took the oath. My father, Newt Gingrich, was among them. After losses in 1974 and 1976, he had finally won the seat for Georgia's 6th Congressional District, to become the sole Republican congressman or senator from Georgia.

January 09, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Politically incorrect and proud

And a pleasant Sunday morning to one and all. I'll make this one short, sweet, simple and to the point.

January 09, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Morgan: Sleepless, but in good company

It's a good thing I'm writing this column on deadline after a rare good night's sleep. You would have found me in a groggy state and bad mood otherwise.

January 07, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: Content worth registering for

We here at The Covington News strive to be your go-to source for what's happening around Newton County.

January 05, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: Bad marks for teacher evaluation

Oh great. Now, the Obama administration is getting involved in public education in Georgia.

January 05, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Dreaming big for 2011

Here we are, ringing in yet another New Year.

January 01, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Of clutter, leftovers and loose ends

If you're really into organization, if you're really into time management, if you really believe that "to everything there is a time and a season," then your Christmas decorations are back in storage in the attic, the Christmas tree has been tagged for the chipper, thank-you notes have been written, and the refrigerator is sparkling and clean, nary a leftover to be found.

December 31, 2010 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Pull the plug and start anew

Good grief! I haven't gotten used to writing 2010 yet and 2011 is here.

December 29, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


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