View Mobile Site

Articles by Section - Columnists


Scholar-athlete charade

Last year's column "Dishonest Educators" (1/9/2013) reported on the largest school cheating scandal in U.S. history. In more than three-quarters of the 56 Atlanta schools investigated, teachers changed student answers on academic achievement tests. Cheating orders came directly from school administrators. The cheating was brazen. One teacher told a colleague, "I had to give your kids, or your students, the answers because they're dumb as hell." Atlanta's not alone. Teacher cheating has been discovered in other cities, such as Philadelphia, Houston, New York, Detroit, Baltimore, Los Angeles and Washington.

November 08, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Peace before sunset

Last week a neighbor friend passed on to his own personal sunset.

November 08, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Getting stuff done

Prognosticators are predicting a Republican takeover of the United States Senate, and a pickup of a few seats in the House of Representatives. Driven in large part by the unpopularity of President Barack Obama (latest Gallup poll 42 percent approve, 53 percent disapprove of Obama), this potential change in control provides both an opportunity and a risk for Republicans.

November 01, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Rasmussen: Election 2014 in context

Political pundits often miss the forest for the trees, and it's amazing how things look when you pause for a moment to look at the broader context of the 2014 midterm elections. The short-term discussion among political junkies is all about whether Republicans can win control of the Senate and just how many seats they will win.

November 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Africa, A Tragic Continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

November 01, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: A salute to one trying to make this a better world

A wise man once said that our only reason for occupying space on this earth is to leave things better than we found them. Unfortunately, not enough of us will. Len Pagano is an exception.

November 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Africa: A tragic continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

October 27, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


The power of positive beliefs

My mother was diagnosed with uterine cancer in the mid-1970s, when I was in grammar school. Her goal, at that time, was to stay alive to see my older sister Kathy and me graduate from high school. She neither dwelled on the disease, nor on why she was stricken with it, but instead focused on getting rid of the cancer and living for her two daughters.

October 25, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich-Cushman | Columnists


Ben Bradlee was a leader and a friend

Ben Bradlee would not have liked me to say so, but he was the living refutation of the Declaration of Independence: All men are not created equal. Certainly, he was not. He was born rich and well-connected, a member of the WASP tribe that once ran much of America and nearly all of its prestigious institutions. He was compellingly handsome and so smart that no crossword puzzle could really challenge him. It's not that he didn't have a weakness. He did. He was a sucker for the underdog.

October 25, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Embarrassing economists

So as to give some perspective, I'm going to ask readers for their guesses about human behavior before explaining my embarrassment by some of my fellow economists.

October 25, 2014 | Walter E. Williams | Columnists


Gov. Deal pledges 'everything on the table' public education reform

Last week Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter shared via this column his vision for public education in Georgia.

October 25, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Americans love community, hate politics

To understand the lack of enthusiasm most Americans feel about the midterm elections, it's important to recognize a vital distinction between government and community.

October 25, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Cushman: Exercise, routine and life

While new and novel might be exciting, routine and habit can help create a structure and framework for success. From eating breakfast, brushing our teeth or exercising every day, much of our lives are driven by routine. This reliance on routine behavior can startle us when we are driving and find ourselves not at our planned destination, but at our routine destination.

October 18, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: A president lacking menace

Tell me something: What do you think would happen if the United States concludes that Iran has been cheating and delaying and is about to pop a fully functional nuclear weapons program? Would President Obama respond by joining Israel to bomb the Iranian nuclear facilities to smithereens - or would he stall and equivocate? My bet is the latter and so, just to double down, is what I bet the Iranians are betting. They have taken the measure of Obama. He lacks menace.

October 18, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


Williams: Officially killing Americans

The Food and Drug Administration can make two types of errors. It can approve a drug that has dangerous unanticipated side effects, or it can reject or delay approval of a drug that is safe and effective. Let's look at these errors, because to err on the side of under- or over-caution is costly.

October 18, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


1 2 3  Next »  Last »

Page 2 of 3

Archive By Section - Columnists


Harwell: Indeed, what would Ronald Reagan do?

Today is the late President Ronald Wilson Reagan's 100th birthday.

February 06, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Tudor: Know thy Legislator

If you happen to be in the minority and can name both your state representative and state senator, congratulations.

February 06, 2011 | By Jim Tudor | Columnists


Cushman: Reagan’s message resonates

Sunday will mark the 100th birthday of Ronald Reagan. Many will be celebrating his birth, his life, and the legacy he left our country and the conservative movement. To celebrate, take a few minutes to watch two of his speeches - his 1964 speech in support of Barry Goldwater and his 1987 speech at the Brandenburg Gate - and you will remember why Reagan was called the Great Communicator, and will notice how his message still resonates with us today.

February 06, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Blackwood: DUI no way to spend Super Sunday

The Super Bowl party has become as popular as the Fourth of July picnic. Go in any supermarket and you'll see a football-themed display of everything from chips and salsa to soft drinks. There is nothing quite like the biggest sporting and television event of the year.

February 04, 2011 | Harris Blackwood | Columnists


Morgan: SPLOST nothing new

Civic duty calls, and I find myself a member of the citizens committee created to push for the continuation of the one-cent Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax on March 15.

February 04, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Yarbrough: House leader seeks teacher input

House Majority Whip Ed Lindsey (R-Atlanta) and I decided to quit lobbing mortars at each other and do what we should have done earlier - talk about his proposed legislation to evaluate teachers.

February 02, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Looking for gold under the Dome

"Don't Tell Momma I'm A Lobbyist, She Thinks I'm a Piano Player in a Bordello," or words to the similar adorned a button that made the rounds at the State Capitol a few years back. Although funny, it really did capture the tone that many people may hear when the "L Word" is mentioned. Exactly what is a lobbyist and what do they do? When my friend and fellow Rotarian Pat Cavannaugh (yes they do allow lobbyists in Rotary) talked about this a while back, he thought it might be interesting to have readers take a look ...

January 30, 2011 | Jim Tudor Guest Columnist | Columnists


Harwell: “The Sputnik Moment”

The State of the Union address and the events leading up to it Tuesday personified the adage teaching "war and politics makes for strange bedfellows."

January 30, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Cushman: Rhetoric obscures values gap

Have you ever had a friendly debate that seems to run in circles? On the surface, it sounds as though you agree, but as the conversation unfolds, it becomes apparent that you and your opponent are using the same words, but the meanings are entirely different. You have fundamental disagreements that cannot be bridged.

January 30, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Morgan: Ethics lax under Gold Dome

The maddening goings-on in Congress are often blamed on "Inside the Beltway" thinking, meaning people who live and work inside the road that encircles Washington are out of touch with the rest of America.

January 28, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: Help us get into your business

We want to get into your business here at The Covington News.

January 25, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Cushman: Dedicate life to service

On Jan. 17, we celebrated the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was assassinated when he was just 39. He would have turned 82 this year. This is the perfect time to think through the legacy and the lessons we should take from his too-short life.

January 23, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Doug Holt: A view from the House

The 2011 legislative session had a rough start. Only events mandated by the state Constitution were held during our first week. Everything else was cancelled due to the historic snow and ice storm that temporarily paralyzed Atlanta.

January 23, 2011 | By Doug Holt | Columnists


Giddens: Writing on the wall for cursive

I have handwriting that can charitably be described as "doctor-like."

January 22, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Morgan: Dreams can grow anywhere

Did you set out when you were young with the sure belief that you were going to change the world?

January 21, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


« First  « Prev  91 92 93 94 95  Next »  Last »

Page 93 of 107


Please wait ...