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Scholar-athlete charade

Last year's column "Dishonest Educators" (1/9/2013) reported on the largest school cheating scandal in U.S. history. In more than three-quarters of the 56 Atlanta schools investigated, teachers changed student answers on academic achievement tests. Cheating orders came directly from school administrators. The cheating was brazen. One teacher told a colleague, "I had to give your kids, or your students, the answers because they're dumb as hell." Atlanta's not alone. Teacher cheating has been discovered in other cities, such as Philadelphia, Houston, New York, Detroit, Baltimore, Los Angeles and Washington.

November 08, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Peace before sunset

Last week a neighbor friend passed on to his own personal sunset.

November 08, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Getting stuff done

Prognosticators are predicting a Republican takeover of the United States Senate, and a pickup of a few seats in the House of Representatives. Driven in large part by the unpopularity of President Barack Obama (latest Gallup poll 42 percent approve, 53 percent disapprove of Obama), this potential change in control provides both an opportunity and a risk for Republicans.

November 01, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Rasmussen: Election 2014 in context

Political pundits often miss the forest for the trees, and it's amazing how things look when you pause for a moment to look at the broader context of the 2014 midterm elections. The short-term discussion among political junkies is all about whether Republicans can win control of the Senate and just how many seats they will win.

November 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Africa, A Tragic Continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

November 01, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: A salute to one trying to make this a better world

A wise man once said that our only reason for occupying space on this earth is to leave things better than we found them. Unfortunately, not enough of us will. Len Pagano is an exception.

November 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Africa: A tragic continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

October 27, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


The power of positive beliefs

My mother was diagnosed with uterine cancer in the mid-1970s, when I was in grammar school. Her goal, at that time, was to stay alive to see my older sister Kathy and me graduate from high school. She neither dwelled on the disease, nor on why she was stricken with it, but instead focused on getting rid of the cancer and living for her two daughters.

October 25, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich-Cushman | Columnists


Ben Bradlee was a leader and a friend

Ben Bradlee would not have liked me to say so, but he was the living refutation of the Declaration of Independence: All men are not created equal. Certainly, he was not. He was born rich and well-connected, a member of the WASP tribe that once ran much of America and nearly all of its prestigious institutions. He was compellingly handsome and so smart that no crossword puzzle could really challenge him. It's not that he didn't have a weakness. He did. He was a sucker for the underdog.

October 25, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Embarrassing economists

So as to give some perspective, I'm going to ask readers for their guesses about human behavior before explaining my embarrassment by some of my fellow economists.

October 25, 2014 | Walter E. Williams | Columnists


Gov. Deal pledges 'everything on the table' public education reform

Last week Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter shared via this column his vision for public education in Georgia.

October 25, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Americans love community, hate politics

To understand the lack of enthusiasm most Americans feel about the midterm elections, it's important to recognize a vital distinction between government and community.

October 25, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Cushman: Exercise, routine and life

While new and novel might be exciting, routine and habit can help create a structure and framework for success. From eating breakfast, brushing our teeth or exercising every day, much of our lives are driven by routine. This reliance on routine behavior can startle us when we are driving and find ourselves not at our planned destination, but at our routine destination.

October 18, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: A president lacking menace

Tell me something: What do you think would happen if the United States concludes that Iran has been cheating and delaying and is about to pop a fully functional nuclear weapons program? Would President Obama respond by joining Israel to bomb the Iranian nuclear facilities to smithereens - or would he stall and equivocate? My bet is the latter and so, just to double down, is what I bet the Iranians are betting. They have taken the measure of Obama. He lacks menace.

October 18, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


Williams: Officially killing Americans

The Food and Drug Administration can make two types of errors. It can approve a drug that has dangerous unanticipated side effects, or it can reject or delay approval of a drug that is safe and effective. Let's look at these errors, because to err on the side of under- or over-caution is costly.

October 18, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Legislation moving forward

It's now at the point in the legislative session where the General Assembly is pushing into the phase where we press to move bills out of each chamber (House and Senate) and over to the other before crossover day. Crossover day is legislative day 30, the last day we can pass a bill out of one chamber and still be able to move it in the other.

March 06, 2011 | By Doug Holt | Columnists


Harwell: Things I know no longer matter

The older I get the more I feel that a good bit of information I've spent a lifetime accumulating may border on the insignificant. I hope I'm wrong, as it's a terrible thing to contemplate having expended enormous effort and priceless, irreplaceable time in the pursuit of knowledge which doesn't matter. But it's important to me, especially in winter, to know that the hot water won't reach the shower head until I've sung the horn line introduction to Sam and Dave's 1967 "Soul Man."

March 06, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


SPLOST paves way to growth for county

Many of you reading this will remember when Newton County was primarily an agricultural community where cotton, orchards, hay fields, cattle, dairies and family gardens dominated the landscape. Others will cherish memories of those days as related by parents and grandparents. Roads that linked farms and homesteads were rutted dirt roads, even the most well-traveled.

March 06, 2011 | By Billy Fortson | Columnists


Cushman: Liberty or bondage?

My 11-year-old daughter asked me to explain how Wisconsin's 14 Democratic state senators can leave the state while they are supposed to be working.

March 06, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Drug war?

I was puzzled by the news of a DEA raid in Atlanta last week. Not that they found drugs and drug dealers in Atlanta. Those are almost as common a peanuts and peaches in Georgia.

March 04, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Morgan: Family matters

The word "family" usually evokes only the warmest and fondest feelings of which we are capable.

March 04, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: Not the image we want to project

Joe Cannelongo is a halfback.

March 02, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: Some good news, sort of

It is not easy being a house husband cum columnist. Trying to figure out where the paper towels are located at the same time I am trying to figure out where the commas go makes my brain hurt.

March 02, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cushman: A mad, mad, mad, mad world

Protests in Tunisia spread to Egypt, which led to the flight of Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak and will lead to who knows what type of government in the end.

February 27, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Tudor: Winner depends on who’s keeping score

As the Georgia legislature begins its march to the halfway mark, few significant pieces of legislation have been dealt with.

February 27, 2011 | Jim Tudor Guest Columnist | Columnists


Harwell: The few, the proud

Every once in a blue moon a television commercial will appear which actually causes me to stop and pay attention. One which does so features United States Marines in dress uniform, executing a rifle drill. As the recruiting message is heard, the line of Marines is shown extending through treasured, prominent American landmarks, from sea to shining sea. The commercial ends as the picture goes to black, with only the loud clack of rifles being handled continuing, thus signifying eternal vigilance by this proud Corps.

February 27, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Weadick: SPLOST investment in community

There has been substantial debate regarding the proposed Newton County Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax, or SPLOST, over the past weeks and months, but the merits of passing a six-year extension to the 1 percent county sales tax are difficult to ignore, namely the $57 million in funding for vital public works and programs in our community.

February 27, 2011 | James Weadick Guest Columnist | Columnists


A tale of two lessons

In his book "The Global Achievement Gap," Harvard Professor Tony Wagner maintains that a "learning walk" through leading suburban high schools will reveal what he calls the "hidden gap."

February 25, 2011 | By Gary Mathews | Columnists


Morgan: These days the world’s in a whirl

The world - this planet - is said to be increasing its speed of spinning and also rotating on its axis.

February 25, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: It’s up to us all to eliminate litter

My haul was 15 pounds.

February 23, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


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