View Mobile Site

Articles by Section - Columnists


Unladylike Black Girls Is Not Cultural Norm

The following is an excerpt from my forthcoming new book, which as yet is untitled.

April 06, 2014 | | Columnists


Recent thoughts stir up flashback with immigration

There was a story on the news recently that the Obama administration is freeing almost as many illegal immigrants as they are rounding up on our western boarders.

April 06, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


The shame of General Motors

He was known as "Engine Charlie." And while Charles Erwin Wilson was both the longtime president of General Motors and Dwight D. Eisenhower's secretary of defense, he has come to a deserved rest in Bartlett's for saying, "What is good for the country is good for General Motors, and what's good for General Motors is good for the country." I couldn't agree more. What would be good for both is if the proper parties are condemned to drive the cars they made.

April 03, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


The Final Quarter

Our two children are into the second week of their final quarter of the school year. Warm weather, longer days and budding plants are pushing their thoughts toward summer. For them, summer equates to vacation, travel, sleeping late and the absence of homework, quizzes and tests.

April 03, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Irritating liberals and conservatives in same week is not easy

Even by my impossibly high standards, this has been a good week. It began with a whack upside the head from a reader in South Georgia after I opined that those who want to change the way we teach our children in public schools ought to have their kids in public schools. I was referring to the efforts led by Sen. William Ligon (R-Brunswick) to overturn the Common Core curriculum in the recent legislative session.

April 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Time for an Affordable Insurance Act

It was passed by Congress, signed by the president and upheld by the Supreme Court. But the individual mandate - a requirement that every American buy the kind of insurance deemed appropriate by the federal government - is being repealed by the American people.

April 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Bizarre Arguments and Behavior

Some statements and arguments are so asinine that you'd have to be an academic or a leftist to take them seriously. Take the accusation that Republicans and conservatives are conducting a war on women. Does that mean they're waging war on their daughters, wives, mothers and other female members of their families? If so, do they abide by the Geneva Conventions' bans on torture, or do they engage in enhanced interrogation and intimidation methods, such as waterboarding, with female family members? You might say that leftists don't mean actual war. Then why do they say it?

March 29, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Mothers of yesterday

The other day I was listening to a group of millennials (birth years ranging from 1980s to the early 2000's) being interviewed by a person who does such things and, with the exception of one person, almost every ideal they discussed was different than the ideals we were brought up on.

March 29, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


One can be the deadliest number

"Sophie, Sophie, don't die! Stay alive for the children,' the dying Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand urged his wife as she slumped over him in the open-topped sports car. But Gavrilo Princip's shot had already killed her. A bodyguard asked Franz Ferdinand if he was in pain. 'It's nothing!' he replied repeatedly. Those were his last words."

March 27, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Nature, Nurture, Talents

As a mother, I often dwell on my role and that of my husband in influencing our children. I also think about the roles their peers and their environment play in affecting their growth.

March 27, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Columnist commandos get scoop on latest developments in crimea

Since the policy of the federal government seems to be to snoop on the conversations of private citizens, I thought it would be appropriate if we turned the tables on them. So, I authorized my columnist commandos to infiltrate the White House disguised as Teleprompters and get the real scoop on the latest developments in Ukraine.

March 25, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


The Wizards of Washington can’t deliver

The political community is abuzz about the growing possibility that Republicans might win control of the Senate this November. But little attention has been paid to a larger and more significant trend.

March 25, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


WRAP UP: Quick look at SB 350, SR 415 and HR 1265

Georgia's 2014 legislative session closed last week, with the House working through two day-long floor sessions. During that time, we considered 44 Senate bills and resolutions, along with dozens of votes to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of bills. The House had already worked on most of the more notable pieces of legislation in play during preceding weeks, but we did see several that were significant, or of interest, during those final two days.

March 22, 2014 | Doug Holt | Columnists


SCA 5 is purest form Of racial bias

California is the poster child for failed socialist policies. It's the place where hippies and communalists went to create their idea of utopia, but, instead, ended up with a hyper-dystopian society. Quoting George Kelly from his book on Personal Construct Theory, the problem, for them, these many years later is "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation is a psychological disorder."

March 22, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Thanking the age of modern medicine

The truth of the matter is that most of us have a great deal to be thankful for of all the discoveries that have made modern medicine a pure miracle.

March 22, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


1 2 3 4  Next »  Last »

Page 2 of 4

Archive By Section - Columnists


Trespassing

Y'know, it's not like I'm a foreigner. But although I've called Covington home now for 33 years, sometimes I still feel like I'm trespassing. I guess it's because I'm a product of a bygone era, something called the mid-20th century. When you grew up in a little town in Georgia back then, you were part of the town and the town was part of you. So when I get to thinking, or just feel the soulful, mournful need to go home, I point the nose of the old Jeep east and head for ...

September 05, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Building American character

This week in Sunday school, we talked about how character is passed down from parents to children through stories, experiences and practice. Every family has different stories - the life narratives that describe what they have lived through, where they came from, and how they acted and reacted. These stories and experiences provide a foundation, an understanding of what the family values. This creates their underlying belief system. This understanding then underpins how we act in our daily lives.

September 05, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Dream on

In modern times, the most famous words ever written about dreams came from the pen of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his speech on August 28, 1963. "I have a dream…" he said, and you know the rest. His dream led to a sea-change in America's society, culture and government. We are a better nation because that man dreamed and dreamed big.

September 03, 2010 | By Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Lead by example

One of the basic tenets of leadership that is taught in our military is "lead by example." The higher your rank, the more important it is that you set a good example and act responsibly. For example, the Army has a tradition of commissioned officers dressed in their finest uniforms serving Thanksgiving dinner to the troops. We were also taught that the officers always wait to eat last in the field in the event there is not enough food to go around.

September 03, 2010 | By John Douglas | Columnists


Ain’t the Way It Used To Be

Female anchors and reporters on the cable news channels and local TV news certainly look different today. The rule used to be that nothing about an anchor should be distracting, nothing flashy, nothing sexy; they should look credible. Credible meant shortish hair (shoulder length max), street eye make-up (no formal evening or look-like-a-hooker eye make-up), no flashy jewelry, no red lipstick, no red nail polish, no tight blouses and no plunging necklines. When I worked with Barbara Walters, Bettina Gregory, Candy Crowley, Katie Couric, Jeanie Moos, Ann Compton (who is still on the air for ABC News) and others, they ...

September 01, 2010 | Staff Report | Columnists


There’s no place like Georgia

You can take the boy out of Georgia, but you can't keep him from swelling with pride while he's gone.

September 01, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Snake oil salesmen in internet clothing

For some time now I've preached about the evil side of the internet and how people can be taken in by ruses or outright hoaxes. Human nature leads us to more or less believe what we see in print. If the internet says it's true, anyone can be fooled, especially those who lack the common sense which comes with life experience to recognize balderdash when they see it. And all too often these days, many people are just too busy to research a fantastic claim made on the internet in order to verify its validity.

August 29, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


How to win the argument — Thatcher style

We know we're not happy with our current government. A Rasmussen poll released last week noted that 40 percent of voters are very angry, and 25 percent are somewhat angry "at the current policies of the federal government." Combined, this means two out of every three likely voters are not happy with their government.

August 29, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Stem cell research — a bipartisan approach?

As I was listening to the back and forth on the recent stem cell research, it occurred to me that an important opportunity for bipartisanship was being overlooked.

August 27, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Writer’s block

OK, folks, it's Wednesday evening, and I'm looking toward a Thursday deadline with no good column topic in mind. Nothing. Nada. Zip. I'm wandering in the desert seeing nothing on the horizon. Panic may set in soon. At the same time, I'm cooking supper that includes beautiful wild chanterelle mushrooms, handpicked by our friends Janet and Mark on their lovely acreage in the country. They ate them last week and didn't die. I'm hoping for the same.

August 27, 2010 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Let’s focus on the important issues

As they moved through the first week of their general election campaign for governor, Nathan Deal and Roy Barnes focused their attention on this burning issue: the proposed construction of a mosque two blocks from the site of the 2001 terrorist attacks in New York City.

August 25, 2010 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


Don’t feel sorry for the squirrels in my backyard

If you find any dead squirrels in my backyard, it is because they have laughed themselves to death.

August 25, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Emily attacks Sarah

There are few things sadder than girls being mean to girls. Boys seem to be able to slough off slights and events, pick up the ball and play again. Girls tend to hold grudges longer, become more self-conscious and end up creating divisions between each other.

August 22, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


The end of the world as we know it

As the 20th century closed I was still toiling as a middle school social studies teacher. I recall archaeologists, in 1999, unearthing pottery shards in a remote area of Pakistan. Primitive writings evident thereupon were carbon-dated to approximately 5500 B.C., and linguists subsequently determined the etchings originated within the extinct Indus civilization.

August 22, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Robert Redford

I've never told anyone this before. I turned down Robert Redford - not once but several times. Oh, his pleadings were sincere. And passionate. He dangled beautiful possibilities before me, were I to return his ardor, but waxed equally eloquent about the sadness and wasted opportunities, were I not to respond. I savored each distinctive flourish of his signature. I imagined him at his desk in the mountains of Utah, picking each word so carefully, crafting a letter that just couldn't be resisted. I could envision the sun glinting off his strawberry blond hair, still thick, hair through which ...

August 20, 2010 | Barbara Morgan Columnist | Columnists


« First  « Prev  87 88 89 90 91  Next »  Last »

Page 89 of 95


Please wait ...