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Articles by Section - Columnists


Cavanaugh: Disappointment, distrust, hope

Publisher note:

August 02, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Massie: Be very afraid, especially for your children

On July 1, 2014, I wrote a syndicated column titled "What If Terrorists Used Infectious Diseases." I postulated that America is being placed in mortal danger as illegal aliens, to which I specifically add the tens of thousands of illegal alien children, are flooding our borders.

July 31, 2014 | | Columnists


Cushman: Republicans — future versus past

As I wrote in last week's column about Georgia's U.S. Senate race between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue, it will all boil down to turnout - who turns out to vote. While the Republican candidates are being fair when they tie the Democratic nominee to the Obama administration, they must do more than hope that Democrats can't persuade voters to go to the polls. The Republican candidates need to create and communicate a clear, compelling message for all voters - that will give them a reason and the passion to turn out and vote Republican this ...

July 31, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Yarbrough: Trying to determine who is the real outsider in U.S. Senate race

The U.S. Senate race this November between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue will be one of the more unusual campaigns we have witnessed in Georgia. Neither has held public office and both are anxious to portray themselves as the ultimate "outsider."

July 29, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Exonerating the criminals

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's anti-Semitism is getting the better of him. Once again, the Turkish prime minister has trotted out the Hitler analogy in relation to Israel and what it has done in Gaza. "They curse Hitler morning and night," he said of the Israelis. "However, now their barbarism has surpassed even Hitler's."

July 29, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Opposition to Hobby Lobby decision highlights problem with mandates

Following the Hobby Lobby Supreme Court decision, one of the key talking points that emerged from enraged opponents of the ruling was: "My boss shouldn't be involved in my health care decisions." California State Senate candidate Sandra Fluke says on her official website that such a perspective is "common sense."

July 26, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Do blacks need favors?

Earlier this month, the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act was celebrated. During the act's legislative debate, then-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, responding to predictions, promised, "I'll eat my hat if this leads to racial quotas." I don't know whether Humphrey got around to keeping his promise, but here's my question: Is it within the capacity of black Americans to make it in this society without the special favors variously called racial preferences, quotas, affirmative action and race-sensitive policies? What might a "yes" answer to that question assume and imply about blacks? Likewise, what would a "no ...

July 26, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Cohen: A fight for Israel’s existence

Israel fought its first war, in 1948, against five Arab nations - Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan - as well as the Palestinians. In the prediction of the fairly new CIA, the outcome was never in doubt: "Without substantial outside aid in terms of manpower and material, they [the Jews] will be able to hold out no longer than two years." It has now been 66 years, but I fear that sooner or later, the CIA's conclusion could turn out to be right.

July 24, 2014 | | Columnists


Johnson: Getting on the same page of the 2050 Plan

Last week I attended two informal meetings of citizens and two Chamber of Commerce moderated meetings on the 2050 Plan and a meeting on the Highway 278 Community Improvement District. I came away with an appreciation of just how similar is the end result most of us want for Newton County and yet how distant are the means that we would employ to accomplish that end.

July 22, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Dream home to house from hell

I wrote this some time ago. With so many folks in the same boat as I was in those early days of my adulthood, I thought you might get a chuckle from my young eager mistakes:

July 19, 2014 | Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Virtues require underlying framework

This summer has served as a reminder to me about the virtue of virtues, specifically hard work and perseverance. Last winter, our 12-year-old son, Robert, was accepted into an honors performance group as a string bass player, based on his teacher's recommendation and an MP3 submission of his playing. In May, he was sent four pieces of music to master by late June, when he was to perform them in New York.

July 17, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Williams: Spending and morality

During last year's budget negotiation meetings, President Barack Obama told House Speaker John Boehner, "We don't have a spending problem." When Boehner responded with "But, Mr. President, we have a very serious spending problem," Obama replied, "I'm getting tired of hearing you say that." In one sense, the president is right. What's being called a spending problem is really a symptom of an unappreciated deep-seated national moral rot. Let's examine it with a few questions.

July 17, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: The job of waxing poetic can be quite frenetic

"I have gotten bad news and am much the worse for it.

July 15, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Conservatives will buy anything

They had a term for her, but I've forgotten it. It was a name applied to a person who could not say no to a door-to-door salesman. The one I remember from my brief career selling magazines was totally upfront about her intentions. "I'll buy whatever you're selling," she said. I sold her Esquire and two other subscriptions. Salesmen back then had a name for such people. Today, I would call them conservatives. They, too, will buy anything.

July 15, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Political language, not Watergate, to blame for public distrust of government

In his weekly column for CNN.com, Julian Zelizer makes a reasonable case that "Distrustful Americans still live in age of Watergate." In his eyes, this helps explain why the president's health care law and other initiatives have encountered so much resistance.

July 12, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Durusau: Guns and Bibles

It doesn't happen very often, but every now and again I will agree with a Republican proposal.

February 18, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Yarbrough: A public relations train wreck

Things are in a mess under the Gold Dome and I may be responsible.

February 16, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Giddens: Keeping HOPE

The anguished call came in the night three Christmases ago, a voice mail message left by the son with whom I share a name.

February 15, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Harwell: Happy Valentine’s Day

Well, we've survived the great blizzards of 2011. The sky is blue, the temperature is rising, little buds have appeared on the end of tree branches, and Monday is Valentine's Day. Things are looking up.

February 13, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Get on the Main Street

On Thursday, this community has the opportunity to be part of local training hosted by the Department of Community Affairs's Office of Downtown Development. The department staff will introduce downtown stakeholders to the Main Street Four-Point Approach to downtown revitalization. It is an opportunity to learn how the concepts of design, economic restructuring, organization and promotion mesh to form the Main Street program.

February 13, 2011 | Josephine Kelly Guest Columnist | Columnists


Be prepared and leave the herd behind

If anyone has visited the state capitol during a time when the General Assembly is in session you've probably seen the herd.

February 13, 2011 | Jim Tudor Guest Columnist | Columnists


False defense of the indefensible

The Newton County commissioners' $57.6 million sales tax proposal raises this interesting question: Why are these officials and the bankers, auto dealers and big land owners behind them so determined to defend the indefensible by skirting the law and trashing the truth?

February 11, 2011 | By Claude Sitton | Columnists


Morgan: Of Love, loyalty and Sinatra

It's the season of hearts and flowers, wine and chocolate, mushy cards or, better yet, jewelry.

February 10, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Giddens: Why can’t we be friends?

The conversation is engaged and ongoing at our Facebook site, and we thank you.

February 09, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: Some thoughts at random

State Rep. Rich Golick (R-Smyrna) is one of the more able members of the Georgia General Assembly and a serious young man not given to hyperbole.

February 09, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Giddens: Grave concerns a lifetime interest

I spent part of the chilled, gloomy first day of February in an appropriate place, Oxford's historic cemetery.

February 07, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Harwell: Indeed, what would Ronald Reagan do?

Today is the late President Ronald Wilson Reagan's 100th birthday.

February 06, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Tudor: Know thy Legislator

If you happen to be in the minority and can name both your state representative and state senator, congratulations.

February 06, 2011 | By Jim Tudor | Columnists


Cushman: Reagan’s message resonates

Sunday will mark the 100th birthday of Ronald Reagan. Many will be celebrating his birth, his life, and the legacy he left our country and the conservative movement. To celebrate, take a few minutes to watch two of his speeches - his 1964 speech in support of Barry Goldwater and his 1987 speech at the Brandenburg Gate - and you will remember why Reagan was called the Great Communicator, and will notice how his message still resonates with us today.

February 06, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Blackwood: DUI no way to spend Super Sunday

The Super Bowl party has become as popular as the Fourth of July picnic. Go in any supermarket and you'll see a football-themed display of everything from chips and salsa to soft drinks. There is nothing quite like the biggest sporting and television event of the year.

February 04, 2011 | Harris Blackwood | Columnists


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