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Thinning out the alternatives for Jekyll Islander

I have one of the most interesting jobs in the world. One day I am advising world leaders on the nuances of international monetary policy. The next day I am consoling a distraught reader who thinks I need to "look within myself spiritually." The last time I looked within myself, I saw my navel. It was full of lint. Never again.

September 23, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


A policy developed in spurts

Of all the experts I have read or consulted lately about the situation in the Middle East, the one who made the most sense was quoted recently in The New York Times. She's Jennifer Shelton-Armstrong, identified as a 45-year-old Democrat in Mission Viejo, California, who participated in a poll about President Obama's handling of foreign policy and terrorism. This is what she said: "He is ambivalent, and I think it shows. There is no clear plan."

September 23, 2014 | Staff Report | Columnists


An exhausting retirement

I have a friend who recently retired.

September 20, 2014 | Paula Travis | Columnists


The tech-inspired future of education

In 21st-century America, hope and change comes from tech-inspired entrepreneurs.

September 20, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Kissinger’s support for Israel runs deep

At the age of 91, Henry Kissinger has published yet another book - his 17th in 60 years, according to his biographer Walter Isaacson. In that sense, "World Order" is something of a miracle, but it is also a swell read. So, I initially thought, was a review of it in The New York Times by John Micklethwait, the editor-in-chief of the admirable Economist magazine - and I praised it to him in an email. A bit later, I did a double-take. I still like the book, but Micklethwait's review is a different matter.

September 16, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Trying to find the positives in this world can be a negative

The Woman Who Shares My Name instructed me that this week's column was to be about positive things. She says she is tired of bad news and thought you felt the same way. "Surely, you can find some positive things to write about," she said, "and temporarily take people's minds off all the terrible things going on in the world. I think your readers would appreciate that."

September 16, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Favors and Loot for Sale

At a July fundraising event in Chicago, Mrs. Michelle Obama remarked, "So, yeah, there's too much money in politics. There's (sic) special interests that have too much influence." Sen. John McCain has been complaining for years that "there is too much money washing around political campaigns today." According to a 2012 Reuters poll, "Seventy-five percent of Americans feel there is too much money in politics." Let's think about money in politics, but first a few facts.

September 13, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Health Care Law is Obama’s Gift to GOP for 2016

President Obama's health care law is the gift that keeps on giving to the GOP.

September 13, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


So long ago, and yet so near

According to a Gallup Poll released this week, "Americans' trust in the federal government to handle international problems has fallen to a record-low 43 percent, ... Separately, 40 percent of Americans say they have a 'great deal' or 'fair amount' of trust in the federal government to handle domestic problems, also the lowest Gallup has measured to date." (Poll conducted September 4-7, 2014, with 1,017 adults, 95 percent confidence level, +/- 4 points).

September 11, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Blacks should be angry with themselves

What is it that makes so many blacks so angry? What is it that makes so many of them blame the realities of life that beset everyone, e.g., debt, disappointment, etc., a result of their being black?

September 11, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Dalton State College a major player in area’s economic rebound

Remember the story of "The Little Engine That Could?" That could very well describe the city of Dalton, a town of some 34,000 nestled in the corner of Northwest Georgia, not far from the Tennessee line.

September 10, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Blind to the world’s broken windows

"All politics is local," the late Speaker of the House Tip O' Neill famously said. How right he was. The world today is suffering from the failure of President Obama to apply a school of law enforcement that happened to originate in O'Neill's hometown, Boston, and goes by the moniker "broken windows." The problem, simply stated, is that Obama was deaf to the sound of tinkling glass.

September 10, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Robin Hood and the Digital Revolution

The lovable legend of Robin Hood with his band of Merry Men making life difficult for the Sheriff of Nottingham offers a great way to understand the politics of 21st century America.

September 06, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Applying smart power vs. don’t do stupid stuff

What a difference a year makes. Last September, the Obama administration and the media were cheering happenstance as victory. A quick review of last year's events: the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian government on civilians, tough talk by President Barack Obama, an administration push for a congressional vote for use of force, Secretary of State John Kerry's off-the-cuff remark regarding Syria giving up chemical weapons, Russian President Vladimir Putin leveraging the remark into action, the Obama administration claiming a great solution.

September 04, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Vox explanation highlights gap between political world and everybody else

A recent column on Vox.com may have inadvertently highlighted the gap between the nation's political elites and the rest of the nation. Vox is an "explanatory journalism" site founded by former Washington Post columnist and blogger Ezra Klein.

September 04, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


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Grace Notes: See God's power!

This week in the church year, we are celebrating the Ascension of Jesus. That's the day, 40 days after Jesus rose from the dead on Easter, that he elevated in front of the disciples' eyes and rose up to the heavens until the clouds hid him from their sight (See Luke 24 or Acts 1).

June 03, 2011 | Jonathan E. Scharf | Columnists


Living out loud: Blessing, not blessing out…

"Finally, all of you should be of one mind. Sympathize with each other. Love each other as brothers and sisters. Be tenderhearted, and keep a humble attitude. Don't repay evil for evil. Don't retaliate with insults when people insult you. Instead, pay them back with a blessing. That is what God has called you to do, and he will bless you for it."

June 03, 2011 | By Jan McCoy | Columnists


Durusau: AIG questions remain unanswered

The sale of 200 million shares of AIG stock by the U.S. treasury in late May was reported to have made a "small profit." There are a couple of things about that sale and the U.S. ownership stake in AIG I find puzzling.

June 02, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Morgan: Food issues span centuries

It's not as if I were planning a trip to Germany this summer, but being a vegetarian, I would give it a wide berth for now. Some 1,500 people who live there or who have visited there recently have been sickened by one of the world's largest ever outbreaks of a heretofore unknown E. coli infection that has killed 18, making it the deadliest outbreak in history. Suspicion is pointing toward imported lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers, leading Russia to ban all vegetable imports. When the advice is not to eat summer's salad bounty, I think I ...

June 02, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Taking cold comfort from Hotlanta

It's hot, darn hot, about 13 degrees warmer than average, and supposed to top out at a searing 97 degrees today in Newton County.

June 01, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


No apocalypse? No reason to seek forgiveness

Rats. I thought I could get out of writing a column this week.

June 01, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


No discipline to be a disciple

Do you remember the Bible verses about Peter denying Christ three times, or the disciples arguing about seating arrangements up in Heaven, or the time they fell asleep while they should have been praying? How do most good folks react, when they hear about someone who disappointed Jesus? Some of them get high-and-mighty, pretty quickly. "Oh, I wouldn't have let Christ down! No sir! Not me! I'd have marched up to those Roman soldiers, and said, 'You want my savior? Well, you'll have to take me first!' That's what I would have said, praise God!"

May 29, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


Five tales of honor for Memorial Day

Seems the older I get, the faster time flies by. How is it that this year's Memorial Day is upon us? Last year's commemoration of America's most poignant day of remembrances seems like just yesterday.

May 29, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Getting to know you, really

"How're you doing?" "What's up?" "Nice to see you!" "Pleased to meet you!"

May 27, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Trails can make economic sense

"When a rural community with a large base of farm and forestland begins to convert that land into residential development, either as a planned growth strategy or due to market forces and a lack of growth control measures, the local government is virtually guaranteed to head down a path of deteriorating financial stability and increasing local property tax rates."

May 27, 2011 | By Maurice Carter | Columnists


Libraries integral to American life

Newton County Commissioners Mort Ewing and Nancy Schutz mis-spoke when referring to the library as an "entitlement."

May 27, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Notes at random from around Georgia

One of the greatest singing voices I ever heard and one of the most talented people I ever knew died last week and, yes, he was a Georgia Tech Yellow Jacket through and through. Josh Powell lost his battle with multiple myeloma at the age of 70. He was an outstanding basketball player - a part of Tech's first NCAA tournament team in 1960, and captain in 1962. He was an Emory Law graduate who spurned the profession to work with kids through the Josh Powell Summer Day Camp which he began in 1972 and is still in operation today ...

May 25, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Giddens: The music dies in Macon

Georgia is losing one of its hidden treasures.

May 25, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Cushman: Winning the argument, and then the vote

Last week, I attended a Georgia Public Policy Foundation lunch featuring Arthur Brooks, president of American Enterprise Institute. Arthur and I met a few years ago in Atlanta after he gave a speech based on his 2006 book, "Who Really Cares: The Surprising Truth About Compassionate Conservatism."

May 21, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Furnad: Partisanship beyond the limits

It was a training session offered by a statewide governmental association to teach local elected officials how to be better public speakers. As the story was told to me, the instructor began with this advice: "Arrive early for a speech in order to check out the venue, the lighting, the microphone and sound system and, if needed, the laptop for a Power Point presentation. Bring your computer disc or thumb drive and make sure everything works."

May 21, 2011 | Bob Furnad Guest Columnist | Columnists


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