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The shame of General Motors

He was known as "Engine Charlie." And while Charles Erwin Wilson was both the longtime president of General Motors and Dwight D. Eisenhower's secretary of defense, he has come to a deserved rest in Bartlett's for saying, "What is good for the country is good for General Motors, and what's good for General Motors is good for the country." I couldn't agree more. What would be good for both is if the proper parties are condemned to drive the cars they made.

April 03, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


The Final Quarter

Our two children are into the second week of their final quarter of the school year. Warm weather, longer days and budding plants are pushing their thoughts toward summer. For them, summer equates to vacation, travel, sleeping late and the absence of homework, quizzes and tests.

April 03, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Irritating liberals and conservatives in same week is not easy

Even by my impossibly high standards, this has been a good week. It began with a whack upside the head from a reader in South Georgia after I opined that those who want to change the way we teach our children in public schools ought to have their kids in public schools. I was referring to the efforts led by Sen. William Ligon (R-Brunswick) to overturn the Common Core curriculum in the recent legislative session.

April 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Time for an Affordable Insurance Act

It was passed by Congress, signed by the president and upheld by the Supreme Court. But the individual mandate - a requirement that every American buy the kind of insurance deemed appropriate by the federal government - is being repealed by the American people.

April 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Bizarre Arguments and Behavior

Some statements and arguments are so asinine that you'd have to be an academic or a leftist to take them seriously. Take the accusation that Republicans and conservatives are conducting a war on women. Does that mean they're waging war on their daughters, wives, mothers and other female members of their families? If so, do they abide by the Geneva Conventions' bans on torture, or do they engage in enhanced interrogation and intimidation methods, such as waterboarding, with female family members? You might say that leftists don't mean actual war. Then why do they say it?

March 29, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Mothers of yesterday

The other day I was listening to a group of millennials (birth years ranging from 1980s to the early 2000's) being interviewed by a person who does such things and, with the exception of one person, almost every ideal they discussed was different than the ideals we were brought up on.

March 29, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


One can be the deadliest number

"Sophie, Sophie, don't die! Stay alive for the children,' the dying Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand urged his wife as she slumped over him in the open-topped sports car. But Gavrilo Princip's shot had already killed her. A bodyguard asked Franz Ferdinand if he was in pain. 'It's nothing!' he replied repeatedly. Those were his last words."

March 27, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Nature, Nurture, Talents

As a mother, I often dwell on my role and that of my husband in influencing our children. I also think about the roles their peers and their environment play in affecting their growth.

March 27, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Columnist commandos get scoop on latest developments in crimea

Since the policy of the federal government seems to be to snoop on the conversations of private citizens, I thought it would be appropriate if we turned the tables on them. So, I authorized my columnist commandos to infiltrate the White House disguised as Teleprompters and get the real scoop on the latest developments in Ukraine.

March 25, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


The Wizards of Washington can’t deliver

The political community is abuzz about the growing possibility that Republicans might win control of the Senate this November. But little attention has been paid to a larger and more significant trend.

March 25, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


WRAP UP: Quick look at SB 350, SR 415 and HR 1265

Georgia's 2014 legislative session closed last week, with the House working through two day-long floor sessions. During that time, we considered 44 Senate bills and resolutions, along with dozens of votes to resolve differences between House and Senate versions of bills. The House had already worked on most of the more notable pieces of legislation in play during preceding weeks, but we did see several that were significant, or of interest, during those final two days.

March 22, 2014 | Doug Holt | Columnists


SCA 5 is purest form Of racial bias

California is the poster child for failed socialist policies. It's the place where hippies and communalists went to create their idea of utopia, but, instead, ended up with a hyper-dystopian society. Quoting George Kelly from his book on Personal Construct Theory, the problem, for them, these many years later is "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation is a psychological disorder."

March 22, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Thanking the age of modern medicine

The truth of the matter is that most of us have a great deal to be thankful for of all the discoveries that have made modern medicine a pure miracle.

March 22, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Callaway, a Georgian Visionary

Georgia may appear at first glance to be a red state, solidly Republican, but its history is more complex. Those unfamiliar with its political history might be surprised to learn that, for 90 years, the Democratic Party so dominated Georgia that no Republican would run for the governor's office.

March 20, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


The charter conspirators

In the war between the rich and the poor, I'm enlisting on the side of the underdog - the rich. What a drubbing they've been taking! Across the nation, but particularly in cities such as New York and Washington, the rich are incessantly accused of being slyly manipulative and self-serving. For instance, they support charter schools. Apparently, there is nothing worse.

March 20, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Let's get organized

Would that getting organized were as easy as stores and websites devoted to organization suggest. Being organized is more mindset and habit than owning a pop-up dispenser for cotton swabs, a stacking system for cans or a rolling cart for laundry, as marketers would have you think. In just a few months, more than a few of those must-have organizers can end up collecting dust in a dark cabinet or sitting on a shelf in a store that sells donated goods.

October 21, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


It’s not the government schools, stupid

To quote the Church Lady on Saturday Night Live, "Well, isn't that special?" State School Superintendent John Barge and Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), have asked U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan for a waiver of the controversial No Child Left Behind law and, instead, to measure school performance on a broader basis, consisting of scores on a Criterion-Referenced Competency Test along with other factors in a "performance index."

October 19, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Drama in the classroom

Studying drama (plays) was usually a class favorite. Students like to take parts and read the play aloud. But different plays get different responses.

October 19, 2011 | Paula Travis | Columnists


Living the cartoon life

Like most primitive males my age, I'm a cartoon junkie. My pampered generation was raised on animated images of mice, ducks and rabbits stuffing dynamite down each other's pants and gargling with cyanide-laced cocktails.

October 16, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


Mobster rule

The decision to kill Anwar al-Awlaki was the result of months of legal review and reportedly not a single senior government official questioned the decision. Why am I not surprised?

October 16, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


A new line of iGadgets

In what has to prove the world is wobbling in its greased groove, two Americans have won the Nobel Prize in economics.

October 16, 2011 | By Ric Latarski | Columnists


Changes to local government

Changes are coming to county government structures all over the state, and I have made myself a student of those initiatives. As Commissioners, we are educated regarding the Five Forms of Government in Georgia by the Carl Vinson Institute of UGA and the Association of County Commissioners of Georgia. Some changes are the customary "tweaks" for efficiencies and changes due to growth. Many of them involve the institution of a county administrator or county manager form of government in which an administrator or manager is hired by the sitting Board of Commissioners to run all the functions and services of ...

October 16, 2011 | By Kathy Morgan | Columnists


Not simply Reagan recovery

"It's the economy stupid" is the infamous mantra conceived by political consultant James Carville that underscored the main issue driving the 1992 presidential race. A few months later, Bill Clinton replaced George H.W. Bush (41) as president, and it was the focus on the economy that got him there.

October 16, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


A card for every lousy occasion

"Boy, the wife is getting on my nerves. She keeps giving me sympathy cards for being unemployed."

October 13, 2011 | Staff Report | Columnists


Young with traditional values

Appearances can be deceptive. In this age of open disclosure and the Internet, one would think we have access to all knowledge, but we don't. We are still at the mercy of those in charge of providing any given piece of information. Unless we are satisfied with the lop-sided information being spoon-fed to us by those having an agenda, it is up to us to do our own digging for the truth.

October 13, 2011 | Staff Report | Columnists


Yarborough: Native American inventor proud of past

David Petite has a very simple view on the immigration issue raging in the United States.

October 11, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Travis: The different kinds of cards

I went to buy my sister a birthday card and ended up spending more than 30 minutes and reading nearly half of the cards before finally choosing one I was really not satisfied with.

October 11, 2011 | Paula Travis | Columnists


Gingrich: It's going to be a wild ride

I'm a little bit disappointed that Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey is not running for the Republican nomination for president. He was sure to inject another round of excitement into the campaign.

October 08, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Latarski: Atlanta roads can’t keep up with growth

Here's a news flash: an outfit named the Texas Transportation Institute determined Atlanta has the worst commute time of any city in the country.

October 08, 2011 | Ric Latarski Columnist | Columnists


McCoy: Prescription for a nightmare

I'm at my desk, looking at all my prescriptions. Here's one I started when my thyroid went on strike; here's one for my cholesterol; and here's one that all newspaper humor columnists are required to take. How did this happen? When I was a kid, I used nothing stronger than half a baby aspirin. When I had my tonsils out, I think I got a whole one. We just weren't a pill-popping family. Now, I'm surrounded by prescription medicines that promise me a longer and healthier life, if I'll just swallow it all ...

October 08, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


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