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Political stereotyping

While we might like to think that voters research the issues, review the candidates, and then vote for the candidate that best reflects their views, the reality, based on political science research, is much different. A

August 21, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Tuition pays for this

According to College Board, average tuition and fees for the 2013-14 school year totaled $30,094 at private colleges, $8,893 for in-state residents at public colleges and $22,203 for out-of-state residents. Many schools, such as Columbia University and George Washington University, charge yearly tuition and fees close to $50,000. Faced with the increasing costs of higher education, parents and taxpayers might like to know what they're getting for their money.

August 21, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


One letter not enough to polish liberal credential

Rap! Rap! Rap!

August 19, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Held to an unobtainable standard

Back in 1980, an Israeli diplomat met with Ronald Reagan as he was running for president. Reagan was furious over the hostages being held in the American embassy in Iran and told the diplomat he could not understand why the U.S. didn't do what Israel would have done: land troops on the embassy roof and take the Americans out. The dismayed diplomat nodded disingenuously. Yes, that's exactly what Israel would do.

August 19, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Saying ‘I love you’

As I get older unfortunately death rears its ugly head more than I would like to see.

August 16, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Back to school

Maybe it's the fact that both my parents were teachers when I was growing up, or that I was a studious, serious child, but I've always loved going back to school in the fall.

August 14, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Williams: Get ready for denials

Fox News correspondent Geraldo Rivera accused Matt Drudge's website of "the worst kind of jingoistic rhetoric ever" for carrying news stories about the dangers of illegal immigration. He said Drudge "is doing his best to stir up a civil war. I mean, shame on Matt Drudge." Republican Rep. Todd Rokita and his Indiana delegation have been criticized for suggesting the possibility that Latin American children pouring across our southern border are carrying deadly diseases. Some of them have already been discovered to be carrying lice and suffering from disease. We've yet to find out what kind of communicable ...

August 14, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: Gosh dang - what is wrong with a Southern accent?

I just learned of a book called, "Say Goodbye to your Southern Accent." Gosh dang. What is wrong with a Southern accent?

August 12, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: The left’s own slippery slope

Two "leading national security organizations" - that's their own designation, in case you're wondering - have condemned President Obama's "return to the battlefield in Iraq." Their names are a mouthful - the Council for a Livable World and the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation - but their statement is worth reading, not for what it says but for what it doesn't. It offers no hint of how anything other than military intervention was going to save those poor people stuck on a mountain in Iraqi Kurdistan, some of them dying of dehydration, some of them already dead and the ...

August 12, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


March to the Sea: Markers of the March

Stories are the soul of human memory. Ancient people listened to lengthy narratives about the legendary exploits of heroes like Beowulf. When literacy came, the stories were written down on animal hides and papyrus plants. Sometimes, they were carved into brick and bronze memorials.

August 09, 2014 | Kathleen DeMarco | Columnists


Tech entrepreneurs have greater impact on nation than presidents

The tech industry will have a more lasting impact on America's future than Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama combined.

August 09, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


God, Not Crime, Barred From Public Schools

The beginning of school is just around the corner. William Jennings Bryan may not have been able to keep the "monkeys" out of public schools, but Edmund Schemmp (from Abington) and Madalyn Murray O'Hair were successful in getting God out, and the ACLU has been successful in keeping him out.

August 09, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Johnson: Modify it through compromise

About the time of the Mansfield public hearing the chairman came by to see me. He had heard the strong concerns expressed by the public regarding the 2050 Plan Baseline Ordinance, and I think sincerely realized that those concerns had to be addressed. His idea at the time was to pick a small group of people who would represent the position of the landowners in eastern Newton County and a group who were in favor of the plan, lock them in a room and let them come up with a compromise position which preserve the basics of the plan while ...

August 07, 2014 | | Columnists


Cushman: Mom's fine

August has been a challenging month for my family the last few years. Two years ago, while my children, Maggie and Robert, and I were visiting my sister, Kathy, and her husband, Paul, in Key Biscayne, Florida, our mother ended up in the hospital in critical condition. While she recovered temporarily, she ultimately suffered a stroke right when school started in the fall of 2012.

August 07, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: Nixon’s lasting damage

Richard Nixon is not having an easy time of late. The Washington Post alone has run at least three opinion pieces reminding us all that Nixon was a skunk who 40 years ago this month resigned the presidency and flew off to a short-lived exile in California. There the story of Nixon's nefariousness supposedly ends. But it does not. He remains to this day a major political figure.

August 05, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Just call me SugarNat

Once upon a time, way back in 1969, this tender, sheltered kid from a really small town went off to school, landing in Statesboro. That's where Georgia Southern College, a tiny camp of some 6,000 students, was located. And that was it. There wasn't even a McDonald's! Fast food was an emporium on Fair Road called Burger Chef. No kidding.

August 07, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Murder, mayhem and an old song

Do you ever wonder why children aren't completely insane by the time they're adults?

August 06, 2010 | David McCoy | Columnists


Separate but equal seems to be back

I never thought the days of "separate but equal" would return. It was well settled that Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896) was bad law. I wake up one morning to find that both liberals and conservatives both support "separate but equal," at least for Muslims.

August 06, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


It’s hard to stay cool and calm

It started a few days ago. And, yes, it was one of these just too hot and humid days when tempers can get a little short. All our days these days are that way, but that comes with living in Georgia in August.

August 06, 2010 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


The outspoken leader

I had considered the recently-constituted Special Council on Tax Reform and Fairness for Georgians just so much political hooey until I saw who was elected chairman of the council: Adolphus Drewry Frazier, Jr.

August 04, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Running away from the president

When Sarah Palin endorsed Karen Handel prior to the Republican primary, Handel embraced that support and has been attached at the hip to Palin - figuratively speaking - ever since.

August 03, 2010 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


Can Fenn win in 2010?

A race against all odds.

August 01, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Priorities

What's most important in your life right now? Do you find yourself running a routine, following a calendar, or tending to whatever your electronic personal assistant device tells you is urgent today?

July 31, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Lying as a “Family” Value

The leaked secret reports about Afghanistan were disappointing. That Republican and Democratic administrations had kept these secrets was more disappointing. But the reaction of Republican and Democratic officials to the leaked reports was the most disappointing.

July 30, 2010 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Gotta love the library

"I cannot live without books," wrote Thomas Jefferson to John Adams. Apparently, neither can the citizenry of Newton County whose love affair with the Newton County Library helped propel it to the ranking of tops in the entire state, as judged by a national library ratings organization. But we knew this before the nation knew it, didn't we?

July 30, 2010 | Barbara Morgan Columnist | Columnists


The Ox is gored

When they fall, they fall fast.

July 28, 2010 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


An look at the recent primary results

As promised, I have the latest analysis of the recent primary results, courtesy of Junior E. Lee, general manager of the C. Richard Yarbrough Worldwide Media and Pest Control Company, located over a pool room in Greater Garfield.

July 28, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


September 6, 2012

Instead of commenting again on the ability of the Democratic House and Senate to ignore pay-as-you-go when they feel like it (i.e., passing unemployment benefits without paying for them), I have decided this week to indulge in a bit of folderol. In thinking through the following possible scenarios, just imagine what could be:

July 25, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Back-slidin’ into oblivion

Unfortunately, my children never experienced a real, live traveling tent revival. When the subject came up recently, they even professed ignorance of the subject. Seizing the moment, I explained how traveling evangelists would appear on the outskirts of small towns back in the 1950's and 1960's and set up what appeared to be a circus big top - in actuality a surplus Army tent. For a week or so the evangelists would hold nightly services. The sermon was always a fire-and-brimstone call for sinners to repent, eschew worldly ways, accept salvation in Jesus Christ and to give a few ...

July 25, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Blissful ignorance

At the time you're reading this, we two will be readying to fly home after a few days off the coast of Maine on tiny little Peak's Island, three miles east of Portland and reachable by ferry. Dear friends loaned us their perennial summer cottage for a mini-vacation when they would be away, and we jumped at the offer. Who wouldn't? A car would not be required, and bikes were available for getting around to diners and the sole market.

July 23, 2010 | By Barbara Morgan | Columnists


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