View Mobile Site

Articles by Section - Columnists


Massie: Be very afraid, especially for your children

On July 1, 2014, I wrote a syndicated column titled "What If Terrorists Used Infectious Diseases." I postulated that America is being placed in mortal danger as illegal aliens, to which I specifically add the tens of thousands of illegal alien children, are flooding our borders.

July 31, 2014 | | Columnists


Cushman: Republicans — future versus past

As I wrote in last week's column about Georgia's U.S. Senate race between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue, it will all boil down to turnout - who turns out to vote. While the Republican candidates are being fair when they tie the Democratic nominee to the Obama administration, they must do more than hope that Democrats can't persuade voters to go to the polls. The Republican candidates need to create and communicate a clear, compelling message for all voters - that will give them a reason and the passion to turn out and vote Republican this ...

July 31, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Yarbrough: Trying to determine who is the real outsider in U.S. Senate race

The U.S. Senate race this November between Democrat Michelle Nunn and Republican David Perdue will be one of the more unusual campaigns we have witnessed in Georgia. Neither has held public office and both are anxious to portray themselves as the ultimate "outsider."

July 29, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Exonerating the criminals

Recep Tayyip Erdogan's anti-Semitism is getting the better of him. Once again, the Turkish prime minister has trotted out the Hitler analogy in relation to Israel and what it has done in Gaza. "They curse Hitler morning and night," he said of the Israelis. "However, now their barbarism has surpassed even Hitler's."

July 29, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Opposition to Hobby Lobby decision highlights problem with mandates

Following the Hobby Lobby Supreme Court decision, one of the key talking points that emerged from enraged opponents of the ruling was: "My boss shouldn't be involved in my health care decisions." California State Senate candidate Sandra Fluke says on her official website that such a perspective is "common sense."

July 26, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Do blacks need favors?

Earlier this month, the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act was celebrated. During the act's legislative debate, then-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, responding to predictions, promised, "I'll eat my hat if this leads to racial quotas." I don't know whether Humphrey got around to keeping his promise, but here's my question: Is it within the capacity of black Americans to make it in this society without the special favors variously called racial preferences, quotas, affirmative action and race-sensitive policies? What might a "yes" answer to that question assume and imply about blacks? Likewise, what would a "no ...

July 26, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Cohen: A fight for Israel’s existence

Israel fought its first war, in 1948, against five Arab nations - Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan - as well as the Palestinians. In the prediction of the fairly new CIA, the outcome was never in doubt: "Without substantial outside aid in terms of manpower and material, they [the Jews] will be able to hold out no longer than two years." It has now been 66 years, but I fear that sooner or later, the CIA's conclusion could turn out to be right.

July 24, 2014 | | Columnists


Johnson: Getting on the same page of the 2050 Plan

Last week I attended two informal meetings of citizens and two Chamber of Commerce moderated meetings on the 2050 Plan and a meeting on the Highway 278 Community Improvement District. I came away with an appreciation of just how similar is the end result most of us want for Newton County and yet how distant are the means that we would employ to accomplish that end.

July 22, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Dream home to house from hell

I wrote this some time ago. With so many folks in the same boat as I was in those early days of my adulthood, I thought you might get a chuckle from my young eager mistakes:

July 19, 2014 | Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Virtues require underlying framework

This summer has served as a reminder to me about the virtue of virtues, specifically hard work and perseverance. Last winter, our 12-year-old son, Robert, was accepted into an honors performance group as a string bass player, based on his teacher's recommendation and an MP3 submission of his playing. In May, he was sent four pieces of music to master by late June, when he was to perform them in New York.

July 17, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Williams: Spending and morality

During last year's budget negotiation meetings, President Barack Obama told House Speaker John Boehner, "We don't have a spending problem." When Boehner responded with "But, Mr. President, we have a very serious spending problem," Obama replied, "I'm getting tired of hearing you say that." In one sense, the president is right. What's being called a spending problem is really a symptom of an unappreciated deep-seated national moral rot. Let's examine it with a few questions.

July 17, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: The job of waxing poetic can be quite frenetic

"I have gotten bad news and am much the worse for it.

July 15, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: Conservatives will buy anything

They had a term for her, but I've forgotten it. It was a name applied to a person who could not say no to a door-to-door salesman. The one I remember from my brief career selling magazines was totally upfront about her intentions. "I'll buy whatever you're selling," she said. I sold her Esquire and two other subscriptions. Salesmen back then had a name for such people. Today, I would call them conservatives. They, too, will buy anything.

July 15, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Rasmussen: Political language, not Watergate, to blame for public distrust of government

In his weekly column for CNN.com, Julian Zelizer makes a reasonable case that "Distrustful Americans still live in age of Watergate." In his eyes, this helps explain why the president's health care law and other initiatives have encountered so much resistance.

July 12, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Cavanaugh: Adventures in Elizabeth City

One of the advantages of being an older baby boomer is that your mind can easily wander back to days of your youth and every detail of those experiences can be seen as clearly as if you were still that age.

July 12, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


1 2 3 4  Next »  Last »

Page 1 of 4

Archive By Section - Columnists


Ethics issues may impact governor’s race

Do Georgia voters pay attention to ethics issues?

September 15, 2010 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


Teachers, don’t get your hopes up

Pay attention, teachers.

September 15, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Sweet dreams and flying machines

Nine years ago Saturday, radical Islamists attacked The United States of America.

September 12, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


President Obama’s flawed foundation

We all know it happens - people often get confused. They can become overwhelmed and forget who they are and where they came from, allowing outside forces to dictate their actions.

September 12, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cologne by the six pack

I love to smell fine fragrances. Wear chic French perfume around me and I'll sniff the air and try to guess which movie star you're pretending to be. Give me a scratch-and-sniff cologne sample and I'll wear my fingernail down as I scratch up the sweet aroma. But if you apply too much fragrance, I'll turn red and make gagging noises in your direction. I can't help it. I have a sensitive nose, and some people just don't know when to stop spraying, splashing and misting.

September 10, 2010 | David McCoy | Columnists


The great debate

In all the hubbub over the construction of a mosque at Ground Zero in New York City as a reciprocal gesture of friendship to Muslims who have agreed to build the Ali Khamenei Baptist Tabernacle in downtown Tehran, you may have missed the latest debate between Georgia's gubernatorial candidates, sponsored by the Yarbrough Worldwide Media and Pest Control Company, located in a pool hall in Greater Garfield, Ga.

September 08, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Here’s a way to raise graduation rates

One of the criticisms you'll often hear of Georgia is the low percentage of students who stay the course in high school and graduate with a diploma.

September 08, 2010 | Tom Crawford | Columnists


Trespassing

Y'know, it's not like I'm a foreigner. But although I've called Covington home now for 33 years, sometimes I still feel like I'm trespassing. I guess it's because I'm a product of a bygone era, something called the mid-20th century. When you grew up in a little town in Georgia back then, you were part of the town and the town was part of you. So when I get to thinking, or just feel the soulful, mournful need to go home, I point the nose of the old Jeep east and head for ...

September 05, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Building American character

This week in Sunday school, we talked about how character is passed down from parents to children through stories, experiences and practice. Every family has different stories - the life narratives that describe what they have lived through, where they came from, and how they acted and reacted. These stories and experiences provide a foundation, an understanding of what the family values. This creates their underlying belief system. This understanding then underpins how we act in our daily lives.

September 05, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Dream on

In modern times, the most famous words ever written about dreams came from the pen of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his speech on August 28, 1963. "I have a dream…" he said, and you know the rest. His dream led to a sea-change in America's society, culture and government. We are a better nation because that man dreamed and dreamed big.

September 03, 2010 | By Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Lead by example

One of the basic tenets of leadership that is taught in our military is "lead by example." The higher your rank, the more important it is that you set a good example and act responsibly. For example, the Army has a tradition of commissioned officers dressed in their finest uniforms serving Thanksgiving dinner to the troops. We were also taught that the officers always wait to eat last in the field in the event there is not enough food to go around.

September 03, 2010 | By John Douglas | Columnists


Ain’t the Way It Used To Be

Female anchors and reporters on the cable news channels and local TV news certainly look different today. The rule used to be that nothing about an anchor should be distracting, nothing flashy, nothing sexy; they should look credible. Credible meant shortish hair (shoulder length max), street eye make-up (no formal evening or look-like-a-hooker eye make-up), no flashy jewelry, no red lipstick, no red nail polish, no tight blouses and no plunging necklines. When I worked with Barbara Walters, Bettina Gregory, Candy Crowley, Katie Couric, Jeanie Moos, Ann Compton (who is still on the air for ABC News) and others, they ...

September 01, 2010 | Staff Report | Columnists


There’s no place like Georgia

You can take the boy out of Georgia, but you can't keep him from swelling with pride while he's gone.

September 01, 2010 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Snake oil salesmen in internet clothing

For some time now I've preached about the evil side of the internet and how people can be taken in by ruses or outright hoaxes. Human nature leads us to more or less believe what we see in print. If the internet says it's true, anyone can be fooled, especially those who lack the common sense which comes with life experience to recognize balderdash when they see it. And all too often these days, many people are just too busy to research a fantastic claim made on the internet in order to verify its validity.

August 29, 2010 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


How to win the argument — Thatcher style

We know we're not happy with our current government. A Rasmussen poll released last week noted that 40 percent of voters are very angry, and 25 percent are somewhat angry "at the current policies of the federal government." Combined, this means two out of every three likely voters are not happy with their government.

August 29, 2010 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


« First  « Prev  92 93 94 95 96  Next »  Last »

Page 94 of 101


Please wait ...