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Articles by Section - Columnists


Questions of character

Beverly Gage, a Yale historian, was researching a biography of J. Edgar Hoover in the National Archives when she came across the infamous letter the FBI had written to Martin Luther King Jr., outlining in the crudest form his extramarital escapades and suggesting, King concluded, that he kill himself: "There is only one thing left for you to do. You know what it is." King did nothing, but the FBI acted. It leaked its dirt to the press.

November 22, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Thanks and giving

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays. A chance to be grateful instead of focusing on gift-giving and gift-receiving. Family, friends, bountiful feasts and football are at the forefront of our minds rather than cocktail parties and gifts. Think of it as a time to pause and give thanks before the whirlwind of December.

November 22, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


The audacity of arrogance

In the week following the shellacking of his party in the midterm elections, one might think that President Barack Obama would be conciliatory and humble. Instead, he has continued to be audacious - but with arrogance rather than hope.

November 15, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich-Cushman | Columnists


Politics from the bottom up drives reform

In the wake of the midterm elections, many are now speculating about what will happen to President Obama's health care law with a Republican Senate. However, all the partisan talk misses the point. In America, change does not come from politicians. It comes from the American people and the popular culture.

November 15, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Republican gains deep and wide

Little noticed by the Washington press corps is the extent of the Republican State legislative gains in Election 2014. A quick trip to the enormously informative Ballotpedia.org website provides the numbers that the DC reporters overlooked.

November 08, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Now, it's about governing not politics

Part of the allure and fascination of politics is that you don't know what's going to happen until election night is over and all the votes have been counted. It is real-life, high-stakes drama. In the 1970s, it was volunteers who would call in the vote tallies from the precincts. They would be written on the blackboard and the totals calculated as the votes were called in.

November 08, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Scholar-athlete charade

Last year's column "Dishonest Educators" (1/9/2013) reported on the largest school cheating scandal in U.S. history. In more than three-quarters of the 56 Atlanta schools investigated, teachers changed student answers on academic achievement tests. Cheating orders came directly from school administrators. The cheating was brazen. One teacher told a colleague, "I had to give your kids, or your students, the answers because they're dumb as hell." Atlanta's not alone. Teacher cheating has been discovered in other cities, such as Philadelphia, Houston, New York, Detroit, Baltimore, Los Angeles and Washington.

November 08, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Peace before sunset

Last week a neighbor friend passed on to his own personal sunset.

November 08, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Getting stuff done

Prognosticators are predicting a Republican takeover of the United States Senate, and a pickup of a few seats in the House of Representatives. Driven in large part by the unpopularity of President Barack Obama (latest Gallup poll 42 percent approve, 53 percent disapprove of Obama), this potential change in control provides both an opportunity and a risk for Republicans.

November 01, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Rasmussen: Election 2014 in context

Political pundits often miss the forest for the trees, and it's amazing how things look when you pause for a moment to look at the broader context of the 2014 midterm elections. The short-term discussion among political junkies is all about whether Republicans can win control of the Senate and just how many seats they will win.

November 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Williams: Africa, A Tragic Continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

November 01, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: A salute to one trying to make this a better world

A wise man once said that our only reason for occupying space on this earth is to leave things better than we found them. Unfortunately, not enough of us will. Len Pagano is an exception.

November 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Africa: A tragic continent

Here's how my Aug. 11, 2003, column began: "Anyone who believes President Bush's Africa initiative, including sending U.S. troops to Liberia, will amount to more than a hill of beans is whistling Dixie. Maybe it's overly pessimistic, but most of Africa is a continent without much hope for its people." More than a decade has passed since that assessment, and little has changed to suggest a more optimistic outlook. Now Ebola threatens the very existence of the West African nations Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. Moreover, the deadly disease is likely to spread to neighboring nations.

October 27, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


The power of positive beliefs

My mother was diagnosed with uterine cancer in the mid-1970s, when I was in grammar school. Her goal, at that time, was to stay alive to see my older sister Kathy and me graduate from high school. She neither dwelled on the disease, nor on why she was stricken with it, but instead focused on getting rid of the cancer and living for her two daughters.

October 25, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich-Cushman | Columnists


Ben Bradlee was a leader and a friend

Ben Bradlee would not have liked me to say so, but he was the living refutation of the Declaration of Independence: All men are not created equal. Certainly, he was not. He was born rich and well-connected, a member of the WASP tribe that once ran much of America and nearly all of its prestigious institutions. He was compellingly handsome and so smart that no crossword puzzle could really challenge him. It's not that he didn't have a weakness. He did. He was a sucker for the underdog.

October 25, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Durusau: AIG questions remain unanswered

The sale of 200 million shares of AIG stock by the U.S. treasury in late May was reported to have made a "small profit." There are a couple of things about that sale and the U.S. ownership stake in AIG I find puzzling.

June 02, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Morgan: Food issues span centuries

It's not as if I were planning a trip to Germany this summer, but being a vegetarian, I would give it a wide berth for now. Some 1,500 people who live there or who have visited there recently have been sickened by one of the world's largest ever outbreaks of a heretofore unknown E. coli infection that has killed 18, making it the deadliest outbreak in history. Suspicion is pointing toward imported lettuce, tomatoes and cucumbers, leading Russia to ban all vegetable imports. When the advice is not to eat summer's salad bounty, I think I ...

June 02, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Taking cold comfort from Hotlanta

It's hot, darn hot, about 13 degrees warmer than average, and supposed to top out at a searing 97 degrees today in Newton County.

June 01, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


No apocalypse? No reason to seek forgiveness

Rats. I thought I could get out of writing a column this week.

June 01, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


No discipline to be a disciple

Do you remember the Bible verses about Peter denying Christ three times, or the disciples arguing about seating arrangements up in Heaven, or the time they fell asleep while they should have been praying? How do most good folks react, when they hear about someone who disappointed Jesus? Some of them get high-and-mighty, pretty quickly. "Oh, I wouldn't have let Christ down! No sir! Not me! I'd have marched up to those Roman soldiers, and said, 'You want my savior? Well, you'll have to take me first!' That's what I would have said, praise God!"

May 29, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


Five tales of honor for Memorial Day

Seems the older I get, the faster time flies by. How is it that this year's Memorial Day is upon us? Last year's commemoration of America's most poignant day of remembrances seems like just yesterday.

May 29, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


Getting to know you, really

"How're you doing?" "What's up?" "Nice to see you!" "Pleased to meet you!"

May 27, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Trails can make economic sense

"When a rural community with a large base of farm and forestland begins to convert that land into residential development, either as a planned growth strategy or due to market forces and a lack of growth control measures, the local government is virtually guaranteed to head down a path of deteriorating financial stability and increasing local property tax rates."

May 27, 2011 | By Maurice Carter | Columnists


Libraries integral to American life

Newton County Commissioners Mort Ewing and Nancy Schutz mis-spoke when referring to the library as an "entitlement."

May 27, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Notes at random from around Georgia

One of the greatest singing voices I ever heard and one of the most talented people I ever knew died last week and, yes, he was a Georgia Tech Yellow Jacket through and through. Josh Powell lost his battle with multiple myeloma at the age of 70. He was an outstanding basketball player - a part of Tech's first NCAA tournament team in 1960, and captain in 1962. He was an Emory Law graduate who spurned the profession to work with kids through the Josh Powell Summer Day Camp which he began in 1972 and is still in operation today ...

May 25, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Giddens: The music dies in Macon

Georgia is losing one of its hidden treasures.

May 25, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Cushman: Winning the argument, and then the vote

Last week, I attended a Georgia Public Policy Foundation lunch featuring Arthur Brooks, president of American Enterprise Institute. Arthur and I met a few years ago in Atlanta after he gave a speech based on his 2006 book, "Who Really Cares: The Surprising Truth About Compassionate Conservatism."

May 21, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Furnad: Partisanship beyond the limits

It was a training session offered by a statewide governmental association to teach local elected officials how to be better public speakers. As the story was told to me, the instructor began with this advice: "Arrive early for a speech in order to check out the venue, the lighting, the microphone and sound system and, if needed, the laptop for a Power Point presentation. Bring your computer disc or thumb drive and make sure everything works."

May 21, 2011 | Bob Furnad Guest Columnist | Columnists


Just being "catty" here

So what's a broken vase here and there? The same for a dried arrangement or two. It's really only a few pulled threads on that new sweater.The screen on the kitchen window really didn't do anything but keep out the flies and mosquitoes. And why cry over the shredded arm of that upholstered chair? They're only "things."

May 20, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Rule of law should always prevail

What a difference a week makes.

May 20, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


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