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Articles by Section - Columnists


Political stereotyping

While we might like to think that voters research the issues, review the candidates, and then vote for the candidate that best reflects their views, the reality, based on political science research, is much different. A

August 21, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Tuition pays for this

According to College Board, average tuition and fees for the 2013-14 school year totaled $30,094 at private colleges, $8,893 for in-state residents at public colleges and $22,203 for out-of-state residents. Many schools, such as Columbia University and George Washington University, charge yearly tuition and fees close to $50,000. Faced with the increasing costs of higher education, parents and taxpayers might like to know what they're getting for their money.

August 21, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


One letter not enough to polish liberal credential

Rap! Rap! Rap!

August 19, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Held to an unobtainable standard

Back in 1980, an Israeli diplomat met with Ronald Reagan as he was running for president. Reagan was furious over the hostages being held in the American embassy in Iran and told the diplomat he could not understand why the U.S. didn't do what Israel would have done: land troops on the embassy roof and take the Americans out. The dismayed diplomat nodded disingenuously. Yes, that's exactly what Israel would do.

August 19, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Saying ‘I love you’

As I get older unfortunately death rears its ugly head more than I would like to see.

August 16, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Cushman: Back to school

Maybe it's the fact that both my parents were teachers when I was growing up, or that I was a studious, serious child, but I've always loved going back to school in the fall.

August 14, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Williams: Get ready for denials

Fox News correspondent Geraldo Rivera accused Matt Drudge's website of "the worst kind of jingoistic rhetoric ever" for carrying news stories about the dangers of illegal immigration. He said Drudge "is doing his best to stir up a civil war. I mean, shame on Matt Drudge." Republican Rep. Todd Rokita and his Indiana delegation have been criticized for suggesting the possibility that Latin American children pouring across our southern border are carrying deadly diseases. Some of them have already been discovered to be carrying lice and suffering from disease. We've yet to find out what kind of communicable ...

August 14, 2014 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Yarbrough: Gosh dang - what is wrong with a Southern accent?

I just learned of a book called, "Say Goodbye to your Southern Accent." Gosh dang. What is wrong with a Southern accent?

August 12, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Cohen: The left’s own slippery slope

Two "leading national security organizations" - that's their own designation, in case you're wondering - have condemned President Obama's "return to the battlefield in Iraq." Their names are a mouthful - the Council for a Livable World and the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation - but their statement is worth reading, not for what it says but for what it doesn't. It offers no hint of how anything other than military intervention was going to save those poor people stuck on a mountain in Iraqi Kurdistan, some of them dying of dehydration, some of them already dead and the ...

August 12, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


March to the Sea: Markers of the March

Stories are the soul of human memory. Ancient people listened to lengthy narratives about the legendary exploits of heroes like Beowulf. When literacy came, the stories were written down on animal hides and papyrus plants. Sometimes, they were carved into brick and bronze memorials.

August 09, 2014 | Kathleen DeMarco | Columnists


Tech entrepreneurs have greater impact on nation than presidents

The tech industry will have a more lasting impact on America's future than Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama combined.

August 09, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


God, Not Crime, Barred From Public Schools

The beginning of school is just around the corner. William Jennings Bryan may not have been able to keep the "monkeys" out of public schools, but Edmund Schemmp (from Abington) and Madalyn Murray O'Hair were successful in getting God out, and the ACLU has been successful in keeping him out.

August 09, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Johnson: Modify it through compromise

About the time of the Mansfield public hearing the chairman came by to see me. He had heard the strong concerns expressed by the public regarding the 2050 Plan Baseline Ordinance, and I think sincerely realized that those concerns had to be addressed. His idea at the time was to pick a small group of people who would represent the position of the landowners in eastern Newton County and a group who were in favor of the plan, lock them in a room and let them come up with a compromise position which preserve the basics of the plan while ...

August 07, 2014 | | Columnists


Cushman: Mom's fine

August has been a challenging month for my family the last few years. Two years ago, while my children, Maggie and Robert, and I were visiting my sister, Kathy, and her husband, Paul, in Key Biscayne, Florida, our mother ended up in the hospital in critical condition. While she recovered temporarily, she ultimately suffered a stroke right when school started in the fall of 2012.

August 07, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Cohen: Nixon’s lasting damage

Richard Nixon is not having an easy time of late. The Washington Post alone has run at least three opinion pieces reminding us all that Nixon was a skunk who 40 years ago this month resigned the presidency and flew off to a short-lived exile in California. There the story of Nixon's nefariousness supposedly ends. But it does not. He remains to this day a major political figure.

August 05, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


What would we do without friends?

It should have been a simple evening based on a casual suggestion that six of us go out to dinner on a Wednesday night. But it turned out to be anything but simple.

June 24, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Reflections on education

I had the occasion not long ago to read Daniel Pink's "A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future" (Penguin Books, 2005) and Tony Wagner's "The Global Achievement Gap" (Basic Books, 2008). What follows are Pink's thesis, Wagner's compliment, and implications for K-12 education.

June 24, 2011 | Gary Mathews | Columnists


Giddens: Not in the mood for Laundromat

Donna and I have been without a washer and dryer in the house almost eight months, now.

June 22, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Half-century of matrimony is bookworthy

Two of my favorite school teachers, grandson Nicholas Wansley and Mandy Bragg, were married last week. It was a beautiful and moving ceremony. I pray their marriage will be as happy as they, their families and friends were on that special day.

June 22, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Goodbye to an Italian beauty

Maybe it's a general character flaw shared by many, but I hate to get rid of a cherished old car, no matter how much trouble it causes me.

June 19, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


A Father’s Day tribute to a rare man

It has been 27 years since he passed away and not a day goes by that I don't miss him terribly, especially on Father's Day.

June 18, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Summer reading gets political

Now that summer is upon us it is time to seek out reading material we know as the beach read, the fun novels that have no other purpose than to entertain us.

June 18, 2011 | Ric Latarski Columnist | Columnists


Harwell: Father’s Day

The touching and, perhaps, true story regarding the origination of Father's Day celebrations in America goes back to the little town of Fairmont, W.Va. There, at the behest of a Mrs. Grace Golden, a ceremony was held on July 5, 1908 honoring some 210 fathers who had been tragically lost in the Monongah Mining Disaster of December 6, 1907.

June 18, 2011 | Nat Harwell | Columnists


A tough summer for Georgia farmers

2011 will be known as "the year agriculture went out in Georgia."

June 17, 2011 | Patrick Durusau | Columnists


Summer lived simply and vicariously

Ah, Summer!

June 17, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Living out loud: Tough farewells

Dear brothers and sisters, I close my letter with these last words: Be joyful. Grow to maturity. Encourage each other. Live in harmony and peace. Then the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet each other with Christian love. All of God's people here send you their greetings.

June 17, 2011 | By Jan McCoy | Columnists


Grace Notes: Our Father

"Our Father, who art in heaven..." Doubtless, you're familiar with that beginning to probably the most famous of Christian prayers.

June 17, 2011 | Jonathan E. Scharf | Columnists


Giddens: Fireflies light up the night

Fireflies are out in force at twilight the past few nights.

June 15, 2011 | Tharon Giddens | Columnists


Yarbrough: A Leroy more electable than a Newt

When I heard Newt Gingrich's campaign staff had resigned, I called the premier political analyst in the country to get the low-down on what really happened. That would be Junior E. Lee, general manager of the Yarbrough Worldwide Media and Pest Control Company, located in Greater Garfield, Georgia.

June 15, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Apted: The power of Dad

The late afternoon sun sparkled brightly across the crystal blue swimming pool. Tree frogs croaked lazily from the surrounding forest, and the air smelled of fresh, clean chlorine. It was hot, much hotter than June should be, and we were all beyond ready to dive in.

June 15, 2011 | Kari Apted | Columnists


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