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Articles by Section - Columnists


Freedom First!

The Fourth of July we celebrate this weekend heralds a document proclaiming both our nation's independence and our unwavering commitment to freedom.

July 05, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Constitutional ignorance and dereliction

The nation's demagogues and constitutionally ignorant are using the Charleston, South Carolina, AME church shooting to attack the Second Amendment's "right of the people to keep and bear Arms." A couple of years ago, President Barack Obama said, "I have a profound respect for the traditions of hunting that trace back in this country for generations."

July 05, 2015 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Mass Hysteria in America

In the 1400s, a nun in a French convent started making sounds like a cat. Other nuns began to do the same. Eventually, they started biting one another. As word of the bitings spread, so, too, did the bitings. They swept through other convents all the way to Rome.

July 05, 2015 | Erick Erickson | Columnists


Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution's vice president of university affairs.

July 05, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Former UGA president heads back to Malibu and all is well

Dr. Michael Adams, former president of the University of Georgia, has announced he is returning to Pepperdine University, located in the wilds of Malibu, California, to become chancellor, effective Aug. 1. He had once been that institution's vice president of university affairs.

July 05, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Charleston's compassion

A black church, a maladjusted white kid, and the nation moaning, "My God, not again." A few selected politicians, firm believers in the theory of 'never let a good crisis go to waste', exploited the tragedy to push for more gun control on law abiding citizens. Shame on them. Thankfully, the majority of politicians did the decent thing by grieving with the rest of the country and graciously keeping their mouths shut. Condolences and heart-felt words for the fallen were and always will be a proper and suitable way to express sympathy for a heartbreak such as Charleston.

June 28, 2015 | Pete Mecca | Columnists


Prejudice wrong belief system, but not part of country's DNA

Long before last week's killings in Charleston, South Carolina, which appear to have been motivated by racial hatred, at least one expert in belief systems wrote that a person's prejudices can be changed.

June 28, 2015 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Five young men can define a successful life

Five young men, ages 18 to 23. Two college graduates. Two currently attending college. The youngest headed that way this fall. All good students. All excellent athletes. All standing resolutely before a large assemblage to pay tribute to their grandfather, Rob Neely, who passed away recently after a courageous battle with cancer. And what a tribute it was.

June 28, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


States don’t have rights, people have rights

Next week, we'll be celebrating the 239th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The eloquent cries for freedom and equality voiced in that properly revered document have become what professors Sid Milkis and Marc Landy call the "American Creed." It's a belief that all of us have the right to do whatever we want with our lives so long as we don't interfere with the right of others to do the same.

June 28, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


You're what you say you are

Rachel A. Dolezal, the recently resigned president of the Spokane, Washington, office of the NAACP, has come under a bit of controversy. Both of her parents are white, but for eight years, Dolezal claimed that she was black. In addition to her role as president of an NAACP chapter, Dolezal was an instructor of Africana studies at Eastern Washington University.

June 28, 2015 | Walter Williams | Columnists


Celebrity Politics

It's official. On Tuesday, Donald Trump announced that he is officially running for president of the United States. "And we are going to make our country great again," he added. While I agree with his goal -- making America great again -- it will be interesting to see if his running for the nomination takes us along this path.

June 21, 2015 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


A Lack of Trust

Neither Donald Trump nor Ben Carson will be president of the United States. Having observed political campaigns actively since 1988, neither campaign has the connections, opinion leader support or organizational abilities to win the nomination. But they are candidates who can throw a wrench in the process.

June 21, 2015 | Erick Erickson | Columnists


A Ray of Hope Far from Washington

Listening to the political junkies discuss the 2016 presidential election more than a year ahead of time is enough to depress just about anyone who has a life outside the political bubble. It will get even worse next year with the avalanche of civic pollution known as campaign commercials.

June 21, 2015 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


A Ray of Hope Far from Washington

Listening to the political junkies discuss the 2016 presidential election more than a year ahead of time is enough to depress just about anyone who has a life outside the political bubble. It will get even worse next year with the avalanche of civic pollution known as campaign commercials.

June 21, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Happy 800th birthday, Magna Carta!

What sometimes seem like epic battles to reshape the world generally fade to irrelevance very quickly. To take just one recent example, 20 years ago the Justice Department was trying to break up Microsoft because the software giant was perceived as too powerful to be challenged by other firms. Today, of course, all the talk is of Google and Apple with Microsoft struggling to find a niche.

June 14, 2015 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


Saluting teachers

Believe it or not, I have written a column for one year and this one marks the beginning of a second year. I have yet to understand why you find the trivia of my life interesting, but I am glad you enjoy it.

August 07, 2012 | Paula Travis | Columnists


The heavy burden of government

In my hometown, everyone is required to have a landline telephone so local officials can reach us with a reverse 911 call.

August 04, 2012 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


The emerging ‘drone’ culture

The age of the drones has arrived. It's not possible to uninvent these Orwellian devices, but we can - and must ­- restrain their use.

August 04, 2012 | Eugene Robinson | Columnists


Stuck in beeping reverse

From Tuesday night into Wednesday morning, commercial aircraft were diverted from airspace over the southeastern U.S. when pilots reported hearing loud, persistent beeping in the area. Flights returned to normal once FAA investigators confirmed the beeps were coming from a backup alarm sounding as the State of Georgia shifted into reverse. However, they warn the noise may continue for at least a decade.

August 04, 2012 | Maurice Carter | Columnists


The devil is in the details

As the saying goes, the devil is in the details. It means the devil will have his way with you if you don't pay attention to the finer points in the big plans or schemes that you might devise. He's a crafty fellow and lies in wait in the most innocuous spots to trip you up.

August 02, 2012 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Fierce Five and Olympic Records

Our fascination with the Olympics goes beyond the near-perfect performances of the athletes. It also includes their stories. We watch and experience the trials and triumphs of people who fail, who get up and who triumph once again. Possibly through watching how Olympians perform under pressure, we can learn how to perform under pressure, as well.

Two examples stand out in my mind from this week, in women's gymnastics and men's swimming.

August 02, 2012 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Watching the London Olympics after Atlanta

Hard to believe, but it has been 16 years since the Olympic Games were held in our state. As I watch the festivities in London, I remembered the phone calls I had received over the past year from media members in Great Britain, asking me if I had any thoughts on what was going to happen when the Games began in London. Here is what I told them:

July 31, 2012 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Family photos found

My sister and her daughter and granddaughter came to visit me last week. My niece is researching our family history and wanted to pick our brains and copy whatever pictures we had of our parents and grandparents.

July 31, 2012 | Paula Travis | Columnists


Be inspired by the Olympics

I'm ready for the Olympic Games, ready to watch the best athletes in the world giving it all they have. I'm ready to be inspired.

After a long Republican presidential primary soap opera, continuing mediocre economic news, ongoing information on the Greek crisis, the current silliness of the presidential campaign quips of the day, and last week's tragedy in Aurora, Colo., Americans are in desperate need of inspiration.

July 28, 2012 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Praise for Bush’s PEPFAR

This is a moment for all Americans to be proud of the single best thing George W. Bush did as president: launching

July 28, 2012 | Eugene Robinson | Columnists


Declining views of the economy put Obama’s re-election at risk

Consumer confidence fell to the lowest levels of 2012 this past week. Most Americans believe that both the economy and their own personal finances are getting worse. Just 25 percent believe the economy is getting better, and only 22 percent said the same about their personal finances.

Still, the lows of 2012 aren't nearly as bad as they were in the previous three years. But the trend is discouraging. It looks like yet another year starting with improved outlooks for the economy that fade by summer, and it's clearly taking a toll on the American people.

July 28, 2012 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Carter: Where do we draw the line?

I fully understand why President Barack Obama, candidate Mitt Romney, Speaker of the House John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid don't want to talk about gun control in the wake of the Aurora, Colo. shootings. I don't want to talk about it either.

Not because I don't think it needs to be discussed, but because we've become inept as a nation talking about anything that stirs emotions. Politicians are concerned with losing votes; I'm concerned about losing the goodwill of friends, neighbors and even family. I'm reluctant to throw more fuel on ...

July 28, 2012 | Maurice Carter | Columnists


A reminder to take nothing for granted

I have just returned from a memorable trip to Valdosta. I went there to speak to the Rotary Club. The members laughed in all the right places, which not only was memorable, but downright remarkable. What made the trip even more special were two visits I made while there. I dropped by to see my beloved college professor Dr. Raymond Cook on his 93rd birthday. My detractors will find little comfort in this but I would not be where I am today had I not been assigned Dr. Cook's English Literature course in the spring term of my freshman ...

July 26, 2012 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Someone crossed the line

The bitterness evident in today's national politics is nothing new in the history of this country. It is tempting to say it's never been worse, but that's not true if you look back at the partisan rancor of early pamphleteers in the nascent days of this republic. Dueling opponents often picked up dueling pistols and had it out. Even Thomas Jefferson wasn't above it, this despite the fact that as the principal author of our Declaration of Independence, he chose succinct and timeless words that are beautiful to recall even today. In the pages of his ...

July 26, 2012 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


The clicker dilemma

The ceiling fan and light in my bedroom turn on and off with a remote control. You have to leave the light switch permanently on, and then find the clicker (my household's name for a remote) to operate the controls.

July 24, 2012 | Paula Travis | Columnists


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