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The Color of Georgia

My father, Newt Gingrich, ran for congress in rural, west, middle Georgia in 1974. At the time, Georgia was dominated by the Democratic Party, there were few Republicans in the state and Watergate was in full swing. Somehow, against this headwind, he managed to garner 49 percent of the vote. He never stopped running, waking up the day after the election to shake hands at the Ford Factory as their shift changed.

April 17, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Rand Paul’s amateur hour

Not to put too fine a point on it, but what has Rand Paul ever done? Oh, sure, he's a member of the U.S. Senate, but only a freshman, and it's the only political office he has ever held. He's an ophthalmologist, a father, a husband and the son of Ron Paul, who used to run for president. So now it is son Rand who is doing so. Aside from family tradition, the question is why?

April 17, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Needing to remember what Easter is all about

I wish I had been there. In Jerusalem. With Jesus.

April 15, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Remove the splinter, change the climate

A front page article in Sunday's Atlanta Journal-Constitution discussed the fate of former Atlanta School Superintendent Beverly Hall and her impending trial.

April 15, 2014 | Paula Travis | Columnists


The troubling legacies of racism and crony capitalism

Conservatives and liberals had entirely different reactions to the recent confrontation between Attorney General Eric Holder and Republican Congressman Louie Gohmert. After the event, Holder expressed his view that no previous attorney general or president had ever had to deal with such treatment and that the reason had to do with race. Gohmert, on the other hand, said he was just performing congressional oversight because he didn't think Holder was doing his job.

April 15, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Time in a bottle

If you are considered to be the first of the baby boomers you are in your 60's.

April 12, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


Rumsfeld's battle with truth

There is a moment, a mere moment, when Donald Rumsfeld's eyes well up and he chokes a bit. This comes in Errol Morris' documentary "The Unknown Known," in which Rumsfeld mentions visiting the wounded of the Iraq War. It is then that we get a glance at the man behind the word-playing frat boy who should not be able to sleep at night but from all the evidence does -- soundly. Socrates said the unexamined life is not worth living. Maybe. But in Rumsfeld's case, it is certainly worth watching.

April 10, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


65 million reasons for optimism

I am an optimist. I believe that America's best days are still to come and today's children will live a life far better than their parents and grandparents.

April 08, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Child abuse and neglect need to be priority

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month in Georgia, as proclaimed by Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal. Child abuse is a subject I don't like to think about, let alone write about and you would probably just as soon not hear about. But it is there and we need to acknowledge it and demand some solutions.

April 08, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Unladylike Black Girls Is Not Cultural Norm

The following is an excerpt from my forthcoming new book, which as yet is untitled.

April 06, 2014 | | Columnists


Recent thoughts stir up flashback with immigration

There was a story on the news recently that the Obama administration is freeing almost as many illegal immigrants as they are rounding up on our western boarders.

April 06, 2014 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


The shame of General Motors

He was known as "Engine Charlie." And while Charles Erwin Wilson was both the longtime president of General Motors and Dwight D. Eisenhower's secretary of defense, he has come to a deserved rest in Bartlett's for saying, "What is good for the country is good for General Motors, and what's good for General Motors is good for the country." I couldn't agree more. What would be good for both is if the proper parties are condemned to drive the cars they made.

April 03, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


The Final Quarter

Our two children are into the second week of their final quarter of the school year. Warm weather, longer days and budding plants are pushing their thoughts toward summer. For them, summer equates to vacation, travel, sleeping late and the absence of homework, quizzes and tests.

April 03, 2014 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Irritating liberals and conservatives in same week is not easy

Even by my impossibly high standards, this has been a good week. It began with a whack upside the head from a reader in South Georgia after I opined that those who want to change the way we teach our children in public schools ought to have their kids in public schools. I was referring to the efforts led by Sen. William Ligon (R-Brunswick) to overturn the Common Core curriculum in the recent legislative session.

April 01, 2014 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Time for an Affordable Insurance Act

It was passed by Congress, signed by the president and upheld by the Supreme Court. But the individual mandate - a requirement that every American buy the kind of insurance deemed appropriate by the federal government - is being repealed by the American people.

April 01, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


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Archive By Section - Columnists


The Southern Man’s Genome

Scientists everywhere are decoding the human genome to see what we're made of and how we can make ourselves better. I'm no geneticist, but I know a little bit about southerners, and I'll certify that there is a special part of our DNA that makes us what we really are. We may be talking about just a few genes, but we southerners are programmed in a way that makes our lives much better here in our little part of the world.

December 24, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


The best sort of Christmas gifts

There are few holidays that speak to family memories and traditions more than Christmas. The type of tree, when to put it up, when to take it down, what ancient family ornament goes where, the Christmas morning breakfast, Christmas Day dinner and when to open gifts all are ingrained in our family histories.

December 24, 2011 | By Ric Latarski | Columnists


Christmas Memories

I have always loved Christmas and its traditions; even as I have grown older, I find that really deep in my heart I still believe in Santa Claus and the spirit of the whole season, and I just can't wait until I see the "Frosty the Snowman" and "Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer" re-runs at this time of year with the grandchildren.

December 24, 2011 | T. Pat Cavanaugh | Columnists


There's no place like home

Turn your mind to the late Karen Carpenter's clear voice and listen for her lilting version of "There's No Place Like Home for the Holidays": "Oh, there's no place like home for the holidays, 'cause no matter how far away you roam - if you want to be happy in a million ways, for the holidays - you can't beat home sweet home. For the holidays, you can't beat home sweet home."

December 24, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Christmas Cheer

Christmas memories fill our Christmas tree. It stands in our living room, filled with white lights and ornaments. Our ornaments reflect the life of our family: varied and interesting, some old, some new, some precious and some common.

December 24, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


My own night before Christmas

'Tis just before Christmas, and here in my house

December 21, 2011 | Kari Apted | Columnists


Holiday menu planning

It's time to start thinking about Christmas dinner. I'm cooking, and I am dreading the annual discussion I have with my husband about what to serve.

December 21, 2011 | Paula Travis | Columnists


A big year for politics and mosquitoes

I am pleased to announce that beginning with the New Year, Junior E. Lee, general manager of Round or Square Polls, a division of the Yarbrough Worldwide Media and Pest Control Company located in Greater Garfield, will be offering exclusive analysis of the upcoming presidential election that can be seen only in this space. In addition, if you are bothered with termites, Junior is your man there, too. (He asked me to add that. Junior doesn't want to be seen as a one-trick pony. He is as proud of his reputation as an industry leader in termite eradication as ...

December 21, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


Too hot for comfort

We all make mistakes.

December 18, 2011 | David McCoy | Columnists


The season of shopping

The season of - well of - 'Tis the season and shopping is upon us.

December 18, 2011 | By Ric Latarski | Columnists


I'm glad I cleaned bathrooms

My first paying job was cleaning the bathrooms of the First Baptist Church of Carrollton, Ga. This was also my sister's first job. The money we made was our money. We could decide how to spend it: clothes, records, books, eight-track tapes, whatever we decided.

December 18, 2011 | Jackie Gingrich Cushman | Columnists


Dealing with my disability

This is a letter to the community hoping that it will be read by people who are having a difficult time accepting the unknown about children and adults with disabilities. I am encouraged to write to inform the public about what they might see from time to time in stores, in malls, at fast food restaurants, in barbershops and in grocery stores.

December 18, 2011 | By Jajuan Shaw | Columnists


Looking for some good news

The good news is that Christmas is less than 10 days away! On the other hand, the bad news is that Christmas is less than 10 days away. It's bad when the decorating isn't finished and the house hasn't been cleaned, and you've got 30 or so women from church coming tonight for Ladies' Night Out. It's bad when you haven't decided on the first Christmas gift except for the gift bought for the newest great-niece who shares my middle name. It's bad that if something needs to be ordered, it hasn't ...

December 16, 2011 | Barbara Morgan | Columnists


Good learning starts at home

I have four granddaughters ranging from first grade to fourth grade. Stair steps. Last weekend, the first grader, my youngest, read to me a book about Red Riding Hood. When she got to the part of the story where the wolf was in grandmother's bed, she stopped to show me the picture. I asked her if Red Riding Hood knew it was the wolf and not her grandmother.

December 14, 2011 | Paula Travis | Columnists


Bionic hips and Deal’s slips

Dear Valued Reader:

December 14, 2011 | Dick Yarbrough | Columnists


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