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My journey to a healthier me

I did not win the lottery, but I did find the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow.

July 01, 2014 | Merry Perry | Health


A’s win five straight in Albany tournament

Coach Bill Dallas took his Covington's Post No. 32 Athletics to Albany over the weekend to compete in the Annual Paul Eames Tournament.

July 01, 2014 | Miles Steele | Recreation


Cohen: What your own eyes should tell you

A friend of mine worked for a small-town newspaper years ago and had to write the weather report. The county fair was approaching but the prediction was for rain. So the editors, fearing the wrath of local merchants, ordered my friend to change "rainy" to "sunny." That was the newspaper's policy. It has since been adopted by much of the Republican Party.

July 01, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Letter from Willie Nolley

Dear editor,

June 28, 2014 | Willie Nolley | Letters


Round of 16: Who will survive?

In the 2014 World Cup, we have seen great scoring, thrilling comebacks, last-second-goals, joyous celebrations and painful defeats. Dramatic matches, and their accompanying Maalox moments, have been numerous. We have even seen a player go cannibal and bite one of his competitors. Now we are out of the group phase of play and we begin the "win or go home" portion of the tournament. Half of the tournament field has been culled. We are now left with the best 16 teams in the World Cup.

June 28, 2014 | Rafe Mauran | Sports Columnists


Completing the puzzle

Erik Blackburn Oliver, Oxford artist, historian and author, saw a void in his town's history. Oxford, on the eve of its 175th birthday, had no documentation of its past 100 years.

June 28, 2014 | Samantha Reardon | LOCAL


What are legislative gambits?

If you've ever played chess, you know that an action taken to gain an advantage is called a gambit. Gambits exist in other fields of endeavor, many of which are not games, to include legislating. I'm going to acquaint you with some that I've seen. Many more exist. For the sake of convenience, I'll give them names, but most of those names are just mine.

June 28, 2014 | Doug Holt | LOCAL


Let’s not go too far

Let me begin by saying that I regard Randy Vinson as intelligent, articulate, insightful and a sincerely good person, but I never forget Randy is a planner with one concept of how the world should be planned.

June 26, 2014 | Philip Johnson | Columnists


Letter from Barbara M. Morgan

Dear editor,

June 26, 2014 | Barbara M. Morgan | Letters


5 reasons we need camp meetings now more than ever

Each summer I do something odd by most American standards: I spend one week with my extended family, we sleep in a crowded cabin with no air conditioner and we go to worship services three times per day - alongside of hundreds of others - in an open air structure with a sawdust floor. The songs we sing were written long before I was born and the sermons last much longer than 15 to 18 minutes.

June 26, 2014 | Jonathan Andersen | RELIGION


Crime Briefs: Full moons and stars in Rockdale

It was a full moon - or moons - in Rockdale Sunday night as two drunk men were arrested for public indecency after being caught pulling down their pants and mooning motorists. One suspect even knocked himself out running into a tree as he attempted to flee.

June 25, 2014 | | LOCAL


Best World Cup ever?

At the halfway point of the 2014 FIFA World Cup, it certainly has that kind of potential. For the most part, the world's biggest soccer stars are living up to their potential. We have had some unbelievable moments of individual brilliance.

June 24, 2014 | Rafe Mauran | Sports Columnists


Cohen: The enigmatic war

This is a splendid time to remember the First World War. It started 100 years ago this month with the June 28 shooting of the Austrian archduke and his wife. By the end of the summer, much of Europe was engaged in a war that lasted about four years, toppled four empires, precipitated the communist revolution, created by fiat the modern Middle East, recognized Zionism, made the U.S. a world power and cost the lives of about 10 million fighting men. Historians are still trying to figure out what happened.

June 24, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


Letter from Sam Martin Hay III

Dear editor,

June 24, 2014 | | Letters


Buckhault signs with Cougars

Drew Buckhault will take his baseball talents to the Cougars of Cleveland State Community College next year. Buckhault signed a scholarship to play baseball and attend college at the Cleveland, Tennessee institution.

June 21, 2014 | Miles Steele | Eastside


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First Newton male soccer player to sign an athletic scholarship in over 15 years

It was a historic day for the Newton High School Soccer Program on Wednesday afternoon, as Kenquavious McCollum became the first male soccer player in over 15 years to sign an athletic scholarship.

May 22, 2014 | | Newton


No place for nuance

Eddie called himself a private detective, although all he really did was repossess cars. He would show up around 4 p.m. at the cafe where I worked after school, have his usual cup of coffee, and tell me a thing or two about what we used to call "real life." One day he told me how he used to load his coat pockets with brass doorknobs, which he used to "put out the lights" of homosexuals. I was 16 and getting an education of sorts.

May 22, 2014 | Richard Cohen | OPINION


Hand-in-hand

The tables were lit with candles and the lights were down low. The congregation processed out of the church and into the parish hall to sit down for a Middle-Eastern style meal: olives, hummus, pita and dates.

May 22, 2014 | | RELIGION


Readers vote on Covington's best burger

#1 - Hester's Restaurant and Pool Room

May 22, 2014 | Samantha Reardon | LOCAL


Made in Covington

Bridgestone Golf recently moved its entire premium golf ball manufacturing operations to its North American headquarters located at 1532 Industrial Park Boulevard in Covington.

May 20, 2014 | Samantha Reardon | Business


Donald Sterling has been treated unfairly

Donald Sterling has been treated unjustly; I've said it before, and I remain incalcitrant pursuant to that opinion. Mr. Sterling is being used by race-mongers and melanin pimps as validation of institutional racism - which loosely translated means the modern day equivalents of Joseph Goebbels are using Mr. Sterling's private conversation as proof that in America rich white men are impeding progress for blacks.

May 20, 2014 | Mychal Massie | Columnists


Letters to the Editor

Dear editor,

May 20, 2014 | | Letters


What is #BringBackOurGirls ?

Ever since the radical militant group "Boko Haram" seized and kidnapped more than 200 schoolgirls on April 15 in Nigeria and has continued to hold them hostage, there has been an enormous uproar of activity within the United States and across the globe.

May 19, 2014 | Zach Lang | LOCAL


Doctors must serve patients, not society

When we go to the doctor, most of us expect to receive the best possible advice on whatever ails us.

May 17, 2014 | Scott Rasmussen | Columnists


Summer activities for 3rd grade and up

If you think 4-H is busy during the school year, you should see us all summer!

May 17, 2014 | Terri Kimble | LOCAL


Newton/Eastside Rivalry renewed

Local barbershop conversations are always fascinating to say the least, as people of all ages convene to talk that talk and hopefully get a decent haircut.

May 15, 2014 | Shakeem Holloway | SPORTS


No place for nuance

The term "moral suasion" has fallen into disuse. Its heyday came during the Eisenhower administration when the genial president, a bit soft on institutional racism, failed to denounce the continuing attempt of Southern politicians to keep their schools - and everything else - segregated. Now, I'd like to revive it and apply it to Barack Obama. With some moral suasion, he could end America's shameful practice of capital punishment.

May 15, 2014 | Richard Cohen | Columnists


It’s only a part-time job – right?

Why don't I start by confirming something you always suspected? A state legislator's job is one that you can turn into almost as little or as much work as you want! Maybe you already knew this secret: Unlike the Congress up in D.C., the Georgia legislature has always been a "part-time" venture. We're in session about three months of the year. Doesn't that sound easy? The idea was to allow the members, who were mostly farmers in the beginning, to finish their business in Atlanta and return home in time for growing season. Washington used ...

May 13, 2014 | Doug Holt | LOCAL


Letter: A tribute to Bill Dobbs

Dear Editor,

May 10, 2014 | Steve Horton | Letters


A reader's tribute to a dedicated lady

Music, music, music!

May 10, 2014 | By Joyce P. Fincher Guest Columnist | LOCAL


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