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Posted: April 11, 2014 2:18 p.m.

Masters' Watch: Isner stands tall at Masters, searches for Dawgs

AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — John Isner should be able to find his friends fairly easily at crowded Augusta National.

The 6-foot-10 tennis player, who is ranked ninth in the latest ATP standings, arrived at the Masters on Friday and started searching for his fellow Georgia Bulldogs.

There are a bunch of them in the field.

"It's very cool," Isner said. "It's crazy, really. Not to mention there's probably five or six others that have their (tour) card as well. A lot of Bulldogs, and we are in Georgia, so these guys are going to get a lot of support."

Bubba Watson, Chris Kirk, Harris English, Russell Henley played at Georgia, and Patrick Reed started his college career at Georgia before transferring to Augusta State.

Isner won't have much trouble spotting them. After all, when you're the tallest guy on the grounds, you don't have jockey for a clear view.

— Mark Long, https://twitter.com/APMarkLong

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SENIOR WARMUP: Seven golfers at the Masters will have a short trip to their next event: They'll be playing at a Champions Tour event in suburban Atlanta.

Fifty-four-year-old Fred Couples is the latest senior to commit to the Greater Gwinnett Championship, which will be held next weekend at the TPC Sugarloaf in suburban Atlanta.

That setup is mighty convenient. The Sugarloaf course, which once hosted a PGA Tour event, is about a 2½-hour drive from Augusta National.

Also going straight from the Masters to the Greater Gwinnett Championship are Ben Crenshaw, Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Larry Mize, Mark O'Meara and Miguel Angel Jimenez, who will make his Champions Tour debut at Sugarloaf. The Spaniard turned 50 on Jan. 5.

Of course, all seven have their minds on more important matters at the moment. Especially Jimenez, Couples and Langer, who are actually in contention after the opening round of the Masters.

Jimenez and Couples opened with 1-under-par 71s and Langer shot 72, leaving them all within four shots of leader Bill Haas.

— Paul Newberry, https://twitter.com/pnewberry1963

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LONG LINE: Getting a photo at the Masters takes patience.

Spectators aren't allowed to bring cameras or cellphones onto the hallowed grounds during the four-day tournament, so they have to pay for precious pics on the pristine course.

And if you want to get one in front of the famed clubhouse, get in line — a long line.

More than a hundred people were waiting for their shot Friday morning, hanging out in the warm sun for a couple quick clicks. It's unclear how much the photo costs, but with few other options, it just might be worth it.

— Mark Long

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