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Posted: May 7, 2017 5:00 a.m.

Gingrich Cushman: He's only just begun

Last Saturday marked President Donald Trump's 100th day in office. But you already know that, since he, his administration, his critics and members of the news media have noted this at length.

Presidents are elected to four-year terms. So, while it might make headlines, the 100-day mark represents less than 7 percent of Trump's first term.

He's only just begun.

Trump is unique because he is the only president who entered office with experience neither in government nor in the military.

Barack Obama served 12 years in the Illinois legislature and as a U.S. senator. George W. Bush served as Texas governor for almost six years. Bill Clinton served 12 years as Arkansas governor.

George H. W. Bush had 18 years of experience, including as U.S. congressman from Texas, ambassador to the United Nations, CIA director and vice president. Ronald Reagan served eight years as governor of California. Jimmy Carter served four years in the Georgia Senate and four years as the governor of Georgia.

Gerald Ford served 24 years as a U.S. congressman and a year as vice president. Richard Nixon had 14 years of experience in office, having served as vice president, U.S. senator and U.S. congressman. Lyndon Johnson served 12 years as a U.S. congressman, 12 as a U.S. senator, and two as vice president. John Kennedy had 12 years' experience in the federal government, including stints in the U.S. House and Senate.

Dwight D. Eisenhower had served as the supreme allied commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force during World War II.

Harry Truman served 10 years in the U.S. Senate. Franklin D. Roosevelt served two years in the Massachusetts Senate, seven years as assistant secretary to the Navy and four years as governor of New York. Herbert Hoover served seven years as U.S. Secretary of Commerce. Calvin Coolidge had 13 years of government experience, including as mayor, state senate, governor of Massachusetts and vice president. Warren Harding's 12 years' experience included stints in the Ohio State Senate, as lieutenant governor and as U.S. senator.  Woodrow Wilson served two years as governor of New Jersey.

William Howard Taft served in government for more than 23 years, including as U.S. Secretary of War and chief justice.

Theodore Roosevelt had more than seven years of experience, including as governor of New York and vice president. Grover Cleveland had five years' experience, including as governor of New York. William McKinley had 17 years' experience, including in the U.S. House of Representatives, and as governor of Ohio. Benjamin Harrison served eight years in the U.S. Senate.

Chester A. Arthur served for more than a decade, including six months as vice president. James Garfield served almost 18 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. Rutherford B. Hayes served seven years, including as governor of Ohio.

Ulysses S. Grant served three years as commanding general of the Army. Andrew Johnson served more than 17 years including in the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate, and as vice president.

Abraham Lincoln had a decade of experience, including in the Illinois House of Representatives and the U.S. House of Representatives. James Buchanan had more than 23 years' experience, including in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, the U.S. House of Representatives and as U.S. secretary of state. Franklin Pierce served as a U.S. representative and as a U.S. senator for more than nine years. Millard Fillmore had more than 10 years' experience, including as U.S. congressman and vice president.

Zachary Taylor had served in the Army as a major general.

James Polk had more than 15 years of experience, including as a U.S. senator and governor of Tennessee. John Tyler had more than 14 years of experience, including in the U.S. House of Representatives, as governor of Virginia and in the U.S. Senate. William Henry Harrison had more than 20 years' experience, including in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. .     Martin Van Buren entered the presidency with more than 25 years of experience, including as governor of New York, U.S. secretary of state, and vice president. Andrew Jackson had four years' experience, with time in the U.S. House and Senate.

John Quincy Adams had more than 40 years of experience, including as U.S. representative and U.S. senator. James Monroe served for almost two decades, including as governor of Virginia and secretary of war. James Madison had 18 years' experience including as a delegate to the Congress of the Confederation, in the U.S. House of Representatives and as the U.S. secretary of state.

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams served as vice president.

For each of these men, the learning curve in their first 100 days of office must have been steep. But for Trump, whose background is in business, it is doubtless even steeper. He has used this period to get his feet under him and get a feel for the lay of the land.

He is rapidly learning and has only just begun.

To find out more about Jackie Gingrich Cushman, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com.

 

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